gratuitous

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gra·tu·i·tous

 (grə-to͞o′ĭ-təs, -tyo͞o′-)
adj.
1. Given or granted without return or recompense; unearned.
2. Given or received without cost or obligation; free.
3. Unnecessary or unwarranted; unjustified: gratuitous criticism.

[From Latin grātuītus; see gwerə- in Indo-European roots.]

gra·tu′i·tous·ly adv.
gra·tu′i·tous·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

gratuitous

(ɡrəˈtjuːɪtəs)
adj
1. given or received without payment or obligation
2. without cause; unjustified
3. (Law) law given or made without receiving any value in return: a gratuitous agreement.
[C17: from Latin grātuītus, from grātia favour]
graˈtuitously adv
graˈtuitousness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

gra•tu•i•tous

(grəˈtu ɪ təs, -ˈtyu-)

adj.
1. given, done, or obtained without charge; free; voluntary.
2. being without apparent reason, cause, or justification: a gratuitous insult.
3. Law. given without receiving any return value.
[1650–60; < Latin grātuītus, derivative of grātus thankful; for formation see fortuitous]
gra•tu′i•tous•ly, adv.
gra•tu′i•tous•ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.gratuitous - without cause; "a gratuitous insult"
unmerited - not merited or deserved; "received an unmerited honorary degree"
2.gratuitous - costing nothing; "complimentary tickets"; "free admission"
unpaid - not paid; "unpaid wages"; "an unpaid bill"
3.gratuitous - unnecessary and unwarrantedgratuitous - unnecessary and unwarranted; "a strikers' tent camp...was burned with needless loss of life"
unnecessary, unneeded - not necessary
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

gratuitous

adjective unjustified, unnecessary, needless, unfounded, unwarranted, superfluous, wanton, unprovoked, groundless, baseless, uncalled-for, unmerited, causeless The film has been criticized for its gratuitous violence.
unjustified relevant, provoked, justifiable, well-founded
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

gratuitous

adjective
1. Costing nothing:
Idiom: on the house.
2. Not required, necessary, or warranted by the circumstances of the case:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
لا مُبَرِّر لهمَجّاني
bezdůvodnýbezplatný
gratisuberettigetumotiveret
indokolatlan
endurgjaldslaus, ókeypistilefnislaus, ástæîulaus

gratuitous

[grəˈtjuːɪtəs] ADJ (= free) → gratuito; (= needless) [violence, sex] → gratuito
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

gratuitous

[grəˈtjuːɪtəs] adj [violence] → gratuit(e)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

gratuitous

adjüberflüssig, unnötig; (= unasked-for)unerwünscht
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

gratuitous

[grəˈtjuːɪtəs] adjgratuito/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

gratuity

(grəˈtjuəti) plural graˈtuities noun
a small sum of money given as a reward for good service; a tip.
graˈtuitous adjective
1. (derogatory) done, said etc without good reason or excuse or when not wanted. gratuitous insults.
2. done, given etc without payment. gratuitous advice.
graˈtuitously adverb
graˈtuitousness noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
To her and her like, birth itself was an ordeal of degrading personal compulsion, whose gratuitousness nothing in the result seemed to justify, and at best could only palliate.
I ask him whether he ever feels that his work strays close to gratuitousness, to a kind of wilful lingering over scenes of pain.
The sequence has been severely criticized for its sexism (Adams; Iacovino) and co-writer Damon Lindelof replied to the accusations on May 2013 by acknowledging on Twitter its gratuitousness. Lindelof then apologized for it by stating: "I take responsibility and will be more mindful in the future" (in Child).
So by all accounts, as the world has been witnessing Trump's politics of patronage and humiliating gratuitousness, all of the lines which under previous administrations were blurred, suddenly came to life in bright lights focused on a foreign policy dictated by Israel.
Alphonsus has various thematic and dramaturgical links to other plays by Peele, or by Peele and Shakespeare, especially in scenes that border on absurdity and gratuitousness. Like Titus Andronicus, the play shows a violated daughter stabbed in an honour killing by her maddened father who likens himself to Virginius.
that keeps them from growing soft from ease and gratuitousness, or from
spectacle exists in the gratuitousness of the actor's gesture.
Only the legislations regarding gratuitousness in collective public transport are the responsibility of the governments of the states and municipalities.
We argue that living organ transplant should be treated objectively rather than being absolutely forbidden, and it should be dealt with under the guiding principle on life ethics including voluntariness, gratuitousness and respect.
Let us end with the words of Pope Francis: 'We must recover the whole sense of gift, of gratuitousness, of solidarity.
Yet, there is never heavy-handedness, never an agenda or gratuitousness, and never any suggestion that he knows answers.
Relationality enriches business with a human sense of fraternity that Benedict called "gratuitousness," "logic of gift," and "reciprocity." (55) He formulated his message as a challenge, not as a detailed directive for action, because the concepts are intellectually challenging: their implications for business are not immediately obvious; quite to the contrary, they seem impossible.