gravitational collapse


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

gravitational collapse

n.
1. The implosion of a star or other celestial body under the influence of its own gravity, resulting in a body that is many times smaller and denser than the original body.
2. The process by which stars, star clusters, and galaxies form from interstellar gas under the influence of gravity.

gravitational collapse

What happens to a star when its hydrogen and other energy supplies are unable to maintain gravitation. The collapse’s result can be a black hole, white dwarf, neutron star, or supernova.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gravitational collapse - the implosion of a star resulting from its own gravity; the result is a smaller and denser celestial object
implosion - a sudden inward collapse; "the implosion of a light bulb"
References in periodicals archive ?
Some 80 per cent of the heavy elements in the universe likely formed in collapsars, a rare but heavy element-rich form of supernova explosion from the gravitational collapse of old, massive stars typically 30 times as weighty as our sun, said physics professor Daniel Siegel.
What name is given to a celestial phenomenon that has undergone such total gravitational collapse that no light can escape from it?
Scientists have long hypothesized that our stellar neighborhood formed some 4.6 billion years ago when our Sun came to life following the gravitational collapse of a cloud of gas and dust.
I too could not understand how Karl Schwarzschild, Albert Einstein, Stephen Hawkins, could theorise the existence of Black Holes and their formation by the gravitational collapse of heavy stars.
It was found that Einstein's static universe (5) is critically unstable to gravitational collapse or expansion and in modern cosmological models usually is considered only as the initial state for the inflationary phase [20].
The author covers prerelativity physics, special relativity, general relativity, gravitational collapse, waves and lensing, accretion dynamics, inertial forces, gravity as a gauge theory, and a wide variety of other related subjects over the course of the bookAEs nine chapters.
As the core of Sanduleak -69[degrees] 202 accumulated iron and could produce no further heat to hold it up, it shrank, teetered on the edge of gravitational collapse, and finally fell over the brink.
The structures related to salt intrusions include the development of normal fault in the vicinity of Kalabagh Hills that are believed to be gravitational collapse caused by the flowage and upsection migration of Precambrian Salt Range Formation.
Throughout the western flank of Sierra de la Dehesa, other gravitational collapse structures, similar to those described by Harrison and Falcon (1934, 1936) have been recognized (Figure 1c).
But in the 1960s, newfound astrophysical anomalies suggested that gravitational collapse was at work in the cosmos, and Oppenheimer and Snyder's idea was revived as what came to be known as black holes.