gravitational mass


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Related to gravitational mass: gravitational force, gravitational attraction

gravitational mass

n
(General Physics) the mass of a body determined by its response to the force of gravity. Compare inertial mass
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gravitational mass - (physics) the mass of a body as measured by its gravitational attraction for other bodies
mass - the property of a body that causes it to have weight in a gravitational field
natural philosophy, physics - the science of matter and energy and their interactions; "his favorite subject was physics"
References in periodicals archive ?
To calculate the gravitational force exerted by this infinite universe on a test particle with gravitational mass m located at a point P, we consider all the masses in the universe as arranged in thin concentric spheres centered in P.
[M.sub.gj] is gravitational mass of mass j, G(t) is the gravitational constant in time t and [R.sub.ij] is the distance between the two objects j and i.
Equations of quantum particles with a gravitational interaction terms contain inertial and gravitational mass separately.
For this orbital calculation the MW EoS was employed and each star was fixed at a baryon mass of [M.sub.B] = 1.54 [M.sub.[dot encircle]] and a gravitational mass in isolation of [M.sub.G] = 1.40 [M.sub.[dot encircle]].
In GSA, there are four particulars for every mass: position, inertial mass, active gravitational mass, and passive gravitational mass [35].
This acceleration-gravity equivalence explained a curious Newtonian coincidence: A body's mass (its inertial resistance to changes in motion) is equal to its weight (or gravitational mass), its response to gravity.
a) The mass state b) active gravitational mass c) passive gravitational mass d) the inertial mass.
* Active gravitational mass affects within the system of two or more mass objects with gravitational fields that affect other objects the most.
In simple terms, the former, also called inertial mass, is what causes a car's fender to bend upon impact of another vehicle, while the latter, called gravitational mass, is commonly referred to as "weight."
The equivalence principle [2-4]postulated the equality of inertial and gravitational mass. In 1953, Sciama [5] proposed an explanation for inertia in a steady state universe model, based on an analogy to electromagnetic field theory.
The relation for three masses associated with the body follows from (91)-(94): m' < M < m, where the mass m is part of the rest energy [mc.sup.2]; the mass M determines the relativistic mass of the body substance with the proper fields as the measure of inertia and gravitational mass; the mass m' is the mass of the substance scattered at infinity, where all fields are zero.