gray jay


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Related to gray jay: Perisoreus canadensis

gray jay

n.
A bird (Perisoreus canadensis) of North American coniferous forests, having gray plumage and a black-capped head. Also called camp robber, Canada jay, moosebird, whiskey jack.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

gray′ jay′


n.
a deep-gray and white jay, Perisoreus canadensis, with no crest, common in North American coniferous forests. Also called Canada jay.
[1935–40]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gray jay - a jay of northern North America with black-capped head and no crestgray jay - a jay of northern North America with black-capped head and no crest; noted for boldness in thievery
jay - crested largely blue bird
Perisoreus canadensis capitalis, Rocky Mountain jay - a Canada jay with a white head; widely distributed from Montana to Arizona
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
That's when one of my favorite birds, a Gray Jay (known by many in the Northwest US.
Steller's Jays steal Gray Jay caches: field and laboratory observations.
Not the usual gray jay "camp robbers," but smaller birds with an attitude.
Later, while having lunch, I sum up the birds I saw on the trip: palm warbler, gray jay and belted kingfisher.
The Quaker gray jay: Canadian Friends service work, 1931-2001.
Further observations on the food and predatory habits of the Gray Jay. Canadian Journal of Zoology 48:327-330.
Predators--great blue heron, broad-winged hawk, gray jay, and common raven--were seen in the immediate vicinity of the pond, perhaps taking advantage of the prey base of amphibians, reptiles, birds, and small mammals."
Others include the gray jay (sometimes gray and white; also called Canada jay), found as far south as northern California and Arizona; blue jay (blue crest, back, wings, and tail; white on lower body with black "necklace" on throat), found in central Colorado and Wyoming; Mexican jay (like scrub, with gray throat), found in the Southwest; and pinon jay (wholly dull blue), found from the intermountain area east to Oklahoma.