grey jay

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Related to gray jays: Perisoreus canadensis
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Noun1.grey jay - a jay of northern North America with black-capped head and no crestgrey jay - a jay of northern North America with black-capped head and no crest; noted for boldness in thievery
jay - crested largely blue bird
Perisoreus canadensis capitalis, Rocky Mountain jay - a Canada jay with a white head; widely distributed from Montana to Arizona
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Covering caches in trees makes them less likely to be discovered and pilfered by Steller's Jays (Cyanocitta stelleri) and Gray Jays (Perisoreus canadensis), 2 corvid species inhabiting the forest around the Pattee Canyon raven nest and likely to steal caches made by other species (Burnell and Tomback 1985; Waite 1988; Kalinowski and others 2015).
Caption: PROENNEKE LIKED to make gray jays work for their crackers.
The black spruce and tamarack forest was comparatively silent except for a few rusty blackbirds, gray jays, red-breasted nuthatches, white-crowned sparrows, juncos and boreal chickadees.
Matt and I talked about getting up in a minute and getting moving, but then the next thing I knew, there were gray jays calling and it was almost daylight.
There are examples of evisceration and/or consumption on other amphibian species by Corvids such as gray jays, Stellar's jays, and Clark's nutcrackers (Turner, 1960; Tordoff, 1980; Beiswenger, 1981; Pilliod, 2002; Murray et al., 2005).
These animals include pine marten, Pika, yellow-bellied marmots, western toads, Cascade frogs, spotted frogs, goldeneye (duck), great gray owls, boreal owl, three-toed and black-backed woodpeckers, gray jays, Clark's nutcracker, mountain bluebirds, and gray-crowned rosy -finch.
Gray jays are a sedentary species, most of them staying in the same general area all year.
In Canada (1994) 63 red squirrels (plots 9, 10, 11, 12, 13) and 5 Gray Jays (plots 11, 13) at ground and shrub nests, 5 deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus; plots 11, 12), 3 red-backed voles (Clethrionomys rutilus; plots 10, 12), and 1 black bear (Ursus americanus; plot 11) at ground nests were photographed.
These include pine marten, Pika, yellow-bellied marmots, western toads, Cascade frogs, spotted frogs, goldeneye (duck), great gray owls, boreal owl, three-toed woodpeckers, black-backed woodpeckers, gray jays, Clark's nutcracker, mountain bluebirds, gray-crowned rosy-finch and many more species.
New York State is so diverse geographically that there are dozens of different species of birds that come in to backyard feeders, from gray jays in the Adirondacks, to Carolina wrens on Long Island, to red-bellied woodpeckers in western New York, to wild turkeys in the Southern Tier.
Unique animals visible in the high Cascades include pine marten, Pika, yellow-bellied marmots, western toads, Cascade frogs, spotted frogs, goldeneye (duck), great gray owls, boreal owl, three-toed woodpeckers, black-backed woodpeckers, gray jays, Clark's nutcracker, mountain bluebirds, gray-crowned rosy-finch and many more species.