graywater


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Related to graywater: Graywater system

gray·wa·ter

 (grā′wô′tər, -wŏt′ər)
n.
Wastewater from household baths, sinks, and washing machines, especially when recycled as for use in gardening or for flushing toilets.

gray·wa·ter

(grā′wô′tər)
Wastewater from household baths and washing machines that is recycled, especially for use in gardening or for flushing toilets.
Did You Know? White water is what you go rafting on. If you ever rafted on graywater, well, you'd need a good shower (in fresh water) at the end of the day to get rid of the smell. To understand graywater, it's best to first define something even smellier: blackwater. Blackwater is, quite simply, the water that gets flushed down the toilet, complete with the reasons why you flushed the toilet. Blackwater can also include water with other organic wastes—from the sink or garbage disposal, for example. Graywater is still not drinkable, but it's less nasty than blackwater. Graywater is the stuff that goes down the drain from other uses, such as showering or laundry. Because it is relatively clean, graywater can be recycled in areas where water is scarce, to irrigate flower beds or to be fed into toilets to become blackwater. These uses conserve fresh water for drinking and bathing.
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Readers learn about water use including how to safely re-use graywater.
The Hagfors grounds hold several environmental features, among them a graywater pond, a community garden on the back side and a seating area in the front shaped like a double helix.
Graywater recycling minimizes the use of fresh water.
Reusing graywater in dry areas may require treatment for more efficient irrigation in arid, sandy soils, according to a new study published in Chemosphere by researchers at the BGU's Zuckerberg Institute for Water Research (ZIWR) Graywater includes any wastewater generated in households or office buildings except from the toilet.
The EPA recommends submetering any system projected to use over 1,000 gallons a day or 100,000 gallons annually, including any alternative water sources such as graywater or rainwater capture.
This was achieved through design of a rainwater collection and filtration system which sent graywater back to toilets, urinals and irrigation along with low-flow fixtures and timers on showers.
The EPA recommends submetering any system expected to use more than 1,000 gallons a day or 100,000 gallons per year, including any alternative water sources like graywater or rainwater capture--this will at least help you identify higher-than-expected consumption that could indicate leaks and measure the impact of conservation strategies.
There is also information on water conservation in the home, irrigation practices, graywater reuse, rainwater harvesting, sustainable wastewater systems, and active solar systems.
Harvested rainwater from green roof and collected steam condensate are reused as graywater in the building and for truck washing.
Rainwater (roof run-off) and graywater (from tub, sink, or laundry but not toilets) can harbor bacteria and other contaminants.
One way to make this transition is through a graywater recycling system.
In fact, reusing your graywater may be the only way to keep your lawn and garden healthy without taking more than your fair share of the community's precious freshwater reserves.