grazing

(redirected from grazing fee)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

graze 1

 (grāz)
v. grazed, graz·ing, graz·es
v.intr.
1. To feed on growing grasses and herbage.
2. Informal
a. To eat a variety of appetizers as a full meal.
b. To eat snacks throughout the day in place of full meals.
v.tr.
1. To feed on (herbage) in a field or on pastureland.
2. To feed on the herbage of (a piece of land).
3. To afford herbage for the feeding of: This field will graze 30 head of cattle.
4. To put (livestock) out to feed.
5. To tend (feeding livestock) in a pasture.

[Middle English grasen, from Old English grasian, from græs, grass; see ghrē- in Indo-European roots.]

graze′a·ble, graz′a·ble adj.
graz′er n.

graze 2

 (grāz)
v. grazed, graz·ing, graz·es
v.tr.
1. To touch lightly in passing; brush. See Synonyms at brush1.
2. To scrape or scratch slightly; abrade.
v.intr.
To scrape or touch something lightly in passing.
n.
1. The act of brushing or scraping along a surface.
2. A minor scratch or abrasion.

[Perhaps from graze.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

grazing

(ˈɡreɪzɪŋ)
n
1. (Agriculture) the vegetation on pastures that is available for livestock to feed upon
2. (Agriculture) the land on which this is growing
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

graz•ing

(ˈgreɪ zɪŋ)

n.
1. pastureland; a pasture.
2. Informal. the act of eating snacks instead of regular meals, or of sampling small portions of a variety of foods.
3. Informal. the practice of switching television channels frequently to watch several programs.
[1400–50]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.grazing - the act of grazinggrazing - the act of grazing      
eating, feeding - the act of consuming food
2.grazing - the act of brushing against while passing
touching, touch - the act of putting two things together with no space between them; "at his touch the room filled with lights"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

grazing

[ˈgreɪzɪŋ] N
1. (= land) → pasto m
2. (= act) → pastoreo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

grazing

[ˈgreɪzɪŋ] n (= pasture) → pâturage m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

grazing

nWeideland nt; this land offers good grazingdies ist gutes Weideland; grazing landWeideland nt; grazing rightsWeiderechte pl
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

grazing

[ˈgreɪzɪŋ] npascolo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Cliven Bundy drew national attention in 2014 when he took up against the Bureau of Land Management in a grazing fee dispute.
It is understood the horses are dumped by owners who will not pay a grazing fee so just leave them wherever they can.
2779/XIV-3-364/75 dated 29.6.81, the grazing fee per buffalo per season is Rs.8 and lopping fee per buffalo per season is 20 Rs (Hasan 1986).
Advocates argue that grazing uses federal land productively and that the grazing fee is fair.
The federal grazing fee, for instance, "is notoriously underpriced, often eight to 10 times lower than fees charged on comparable private grazing land," says Wuerthner.
(110) Babbitt's proposed tripling of the grazing fee, to just under $4 per month per animal, fell out before Congress approved the final rules.
This article provides an empirical study of how economic and environmental interests get mediated through the legislative process and which of these political interests played key rolls in the 1996 Senate vote on higher grazing fees. Section II provides additional background on rangeland and grazing fee issues during the 1980s and 1990s.
Savory has also told ranchers that at $1.54 per animal unit month, the Federal grazing fee is an incredible bargain that ought to be tied to a rancher's effectiveness in managing to improve the land.
The features most offensive to the industry were a proposed increase in the federal grazing fee from about two dollars per cow per month to about four,(37) term-length reductions of grazing permits for ranchers who violate permit conditions or fail to meet resource condition objectives,(38) disqualification of ranchers who violate regulations or permit conditions,(39) assertion of federal title to newly developed sources of livestock water on BLM lands,(40) and a set of national standards and guidelines for rangeland management and ecological conditions.(41)