great auk

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Related to great auks: aurochs, Pinguinus

great auk

n.
A large flightless seabird (Pinguinus impennis) formerly common on northern Atlantic coasts but extinct since the mid-1800s.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

great auk

n
(Animals) a large flightless auk, Pinguinus impennis, extinct since the middle of the 19th century
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

great′ auk′


n.
a large flightless auk, Pinguinus impennis, of rocky islands off N Atlantic coasts: extinct since 1844.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.great auk - large flightless auk of rocky islands off northern Atlantic coastsgreat auk - large flightless auk of rocky islands off northern Atlantic coasts; extinct
auk - black-and-white short-necked web-footed diving bird of northern seas
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Riesenalk
isoruokkisiivetön ruokki
geirfugl
geirfugl
garfågel
References in periodicals archive ?
1844: The very last pair of Great Auks are killed on the Icelandic islet of Eldey at the request of a merchant wanting specimens: the bird's skins had been valuable for many years due to its rarity.
The Tragic Tale of the Great Auk tells the story of great auks, a penguin-like North Atlantic bird species.
Particularly effective is the concluding spread in which ghost great auks haunt an island now inhabited by other nesting seabirds, including the more recently arrived Atlantic puffins, whose burrow nests were only made possible by the soil created from the decomposed bodies of discarded auk carcasses--from death, life.
Other records peg Eldey Island, in Iceland, as the place where the last pair of great auks were killed.
Great auks, standing penguin-upright, laid speckled eggs with one fat end and one almost pointed one.
Soon enough, zoos will be confronting the temptation of de-extincted woolly mammoths (and passenger pigeons, great auks, and Carolina parakeets, among others).
Now we learn that Great Auks, the marauding Shetland bonxies, which used to feed on fish discarded at sea, are feeding instead on young puffins and guillemots because, with the shrinking of the fleet, there are so few discards any more.