great-aunt

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great-aunt

or great aunt (grāt′ănt′, -änt′)
n.
A sister or sister-in-law of one's grandparent. Also called grandaunt.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

great-aunt

or

grandaunt

n
an aunt of one's father or mother; sister of one's grandfather or grandmother
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

grand•aunt

(ˈgrændˌænt, -ˌɑnt)

n.
an aunt of one's father or mother; great-aunt.
[1820–30]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.great-aunt - an aunt of your father or mother
aunt, auntie, aunty - the sister of your father or mother; the wife of your uncle
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

great-aunt

[ˈgreɪtˈɑːnt] Ntía f abuela
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

great-aunt

[ˌgreɪtˈɑːnt] nprozia
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Rose really did have some cause to be sad; for she had no mother, and had lately lost her father also, which left her no home but this with her great-aunts. She had been with them only a week, and, though the dear old ladies had tried their best to make her happy, they had not succeeded very well, for she was unlike any child they had ever seen, and they felt very much as if they had the care of a low-spirited butterfly.
and my function is to paint--and as a painter I have a conception which is altogether genialisch, of your great-aunt or second grandmother as a subject for a picture; therefore, the universe is straining towards that picture through that particular hook or claw which it puts forth in the shape of me-- not true?"
Your great-aunt! `Der Neffe als Onkel' in a tragic sense--ungeheuer!"
Wopsle's great-aunt kept an evening school in the village; that is to say, she was a ridiculous old woman of limited means and unlimited infirmity, who used to go to sleep from six to seven every evening, in the society of youth who paid twopence per week each, for the improving opportunity of seeing her do it.
Wopsle's great-aunt, besides keeping this Educational Institution, kept - in the same room - a little general shop.
Wopsle's great-aunt, I struggled through the alphabet as if it had been a bramble-bush; getting considerably worried and scratched by every letter.
She is really our great-aunt. We have never seen her but we are told she is very deaf and does not like children.
Besides, have a horrible old great-aunt who is always saying to me, with a mournful sigh, `You were such a pretty baby.
An aunt of my father's, and consequently a great-aunt of mine, of whom I shall have more to relate by and by, was the principal magnate of our family.
Why my uncle Podger has a tomb in Kensal Green Cemetery, that is the pride of all that country-side; and my grandfather's vault at Bow is capable of accommodating eight visitors, while my great-aunt Susan has a brick grave in Finchley Churchyard, with a headstone with a coffee- pot sort of thing in bas-relief upon it, and a six-inch best white stone coping all the way round, that cost pounds.
I go to wait on my great-aunt, and a dear, cross old soul she is, too," answered Jo.
As she researches her paternal great-aunts Jadwiga and Michaela, she soon finds out more about their experiences under Nazi occupation.