green ban


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green ban

n
(Environmental Science) Austral a trade union ban on any development that might be considered harmful to the environment
References in periodicals archive ?
The term 'green ban', coined by Mundey himself, became headline news.
Saving our post office THE Green Ban Action Committee has campaigned for a year and a half to halt the destruction of Birmingham's Victoria Square Post Office and stop the building of a massive office complex in its place.
Along the way, McQueen explores the struggle to build one effective building industry union; the often nomadic, hard-bitten lifestyle of men (few women were involved, other than in New South Wales during the heady Green Ban days), as they followed the job or drifted in-and-out of the industry through boom and bust; the personality clashes and the disputes, great and small, that shaped the BLF in each of the States and the ACT; the struggles to rid the union of gangsters and right-wing bosses-men; and, among a plethora of other considerations, the participation and impact of the various nationalities that went into making the BLF.
This provocative tactic occurred in the case of the very first Sydney-area green ban in June 1971: the ban on the destruction of Kelly's Bush.
(2) Standing next to White that day was the secretary of the New South Wales Builders Labourers' Federation (NSWBLF), Jack Mundey, who had just announced that his union would place a 'green ban' on any development in the park.
Another leading nonprofit, Pesticide Action Network North America (PANNA), likes Herbal Armor, Buzz Away and Green Ban, each containing citronella and peppermint as well as various essential oils (cedar wood, lemongrass, etc.).
The context in which the best-known Australian green ban struggles occurred (where workers refused to work on projects that are held to be anti-environmental) strongly resembles the current context of widespread gentrification ("regeneration") of working-class areas.
Citronella-based products, such as Natrapel, Green Ban for People and Buzz Away, lasted anywhere from 13 minutes to 20 minutes.
The "Green Ban Period," as it was known throughout the country, saw unionists refusing to work on sites where resident activists were fighting to keep their housing, historical sites, or parkland.
Jack Mundey spoke alongside Verity and Meredith Burgmann in a session celebrating the 40th anniversary of the first Green Ban. Sue Taffe and Heather Goodall sparked lively discussion with their papers on Shirley Andrews and Kevin Cook.
Kingstanding police also failed to send a representative to propose the Stockland Green ban covering the Marsh Lane and Short Heath after Sgt Kirsty Morrin requested a ban.
The book also conveys a sense of the highly-charged atmosphere that coalesced around the green ban movement.