greenstick fracture


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Related to greenstick fracture: comminuted fracture

green·stick fracture

 (grēn′stĭk′)
n.
A partial bone fracture, usually seen in young people, in which one side of the bone is broken and the other side is bent.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

greenstick fracture

(ˈɡriːnˌstɪk)
n
(Pathology) a fracture in children in which the bone is partly bent and splinters only on the convex side of the bend
[C20: alluding to the similar way in which a green stick splinters]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

green′stick frac′ture

(ˈgrinˌstɪk)
n.
an incomplete fracture of a long bone, in which one side is broken and the other side is intact.
[1880–85]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.greenstick fracture - a partial fracture of a bone (usually in children); the bone is bent but broken on only one side
incomplete fracture - fracture that does not go across the entire width of the bone
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
(9) If the force is great enough, it can ultimately cause the cortex to break along the tension side of the fracture while the cortex on the compression side remains intact, which is termed the greenstick fracture. (8,10) In contrast to buckle fractures, greenstick fractures tend to be unstable and can displace even after the first two weeks.
Another study found that the presence of cartilage in the skeletal system in children and a greenstick fracture pattern may help both soft and hard tissues absorb a traumatic force (29).
This technique was modified by Dautery, in which the greenstick fracture was carried out at the zygomaticotemporal suture to serve as a stop to upward and forward movements of condylar head and inward and downward displacement of anterior segment.
Clinicoradiologically, diagnosis of Gustilo-Anderson Type IIIB Open Bilateral Distal Radius Physeal Separation (Salter-Harris type I) with greenstick fracture of right distal ulna was established.
The osteotomy was performed starting from the access point, and a greenstick fracture occurred with minimal manual pressure at the canthal level after execution of the osteotomy on the opposite side (figure 2).
A greenstick fracture was present on the medial cortex of the left tarsometatarsus at the junction of the diaphysis and proximal metaphysis (Fig 2).