greyhound racing


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greyhound racing

n
(Individual Sports, other than specified) a sport in which a mechanically propelled dummy hare is pursued by greyhounds around a race track
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.greyhound racing - the sport of racing greyhoundsgreyhound racing - the sport of racing greyhounds  
racing - the sport of engaging in contests of speed
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

greyhound racing

nWindhundrennen nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Seriously, the demonstrators are highlighting the festivals' association with greyhound racing and the gross abuses of the unfortunate dogs exposed by RTE Investigates.
FOLLOWING the withdrawal of sponsorship by Barrys Tea and FBD Insurance from Irish greyhound racing after the RTE Prime Time Investigates programme aired last week, there has been a number of rumours circulating regarding continued backing from other companies, writes Ian Fortune.
NINETY years ago, on April 7, 1928, greyhound racing came to Cardiff at the Welsh White City Stadium at Sloper Road.
Birmingham City Council's planning committee voted by nine to two against plans to demolish the greyhound racing stadium and build 210 homes on the site.
OFTEN attracting regular crowds of more than 1,000, Cleveland Park was a popular venue for greyhound racing.
Greyhound racing began in the UK in 1926, since then thousands of greyhounds have been and are still destroyed every year once they are retired from racing, average age three or four years old.
GREYHOUND racing is set to return to Coventry after an application for a new licence was approved.
AS SOMEONE whose livelihood depends upon the greyhound racing industry, Stephen Rea, director of the Greyhound Racing Association, could hardly be expected to have a balanced view of Greyhound Action's attempt to cast a more searching light upon the stark realities of greyhound welfare.
THE evidence against the greyhound racing industry is continuing to mount.
The most intriguing is what's left unsaid: that greyhound racing has become a financial albatross for the tracks that offer it.
This event is regarded as the most prestigious on the greyhound racing calendar and, with pounds 100,000 of prize money on offer, the owners will be hoping their dogs can stay in contention.

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