gridiron

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grid·i·ron

 (grĭd′ī′ərn)
n.
1. Football
a. The field of play.
b. The game itself.
2. A metal structure high above the stage of a theater, from which ropes or cables are strung to scenery and lights.
3.
a. A flat framework of parallel metal bars used for broiling meat or fish.
b. An object resembling such a framework.

[Middle English gridirne, lattice, grill, alteration (influenced by iren, irne, iron) of gridere, alteration of gridel; see griddle.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

gridiron

(ˈɡrɪdˌaɪən)
n
1. (Cookery) a utensil of parallel metal bars, used to grill meat, fish, etc
2. any framework resembling this utensil
3. (Theatre) a framework above the stage in a theatre from which suspended scenery, lights, etc, are manipulated
4. (American Football)
a. the field of play in American football
b. an informal name for American football
c. (as modifier): a gridiron hero.
Often shortened to: grid
[C13 gredire, perhaps variant (through influence of ire iron) of gredile griddle]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

grid•i•ron

(ˈgrɪdˌaɪ ərn)

n.
1. a football field.
2. a utensil consisting of parallel metal bars on which to broil meat or other food.
3. any framework or network resembling a gridiron.
4. a structure above the stage of a theater, from which scenery and the like are manipulated.
v.t.
6. to mark off into squares.
[1250–1300; Middle English gridirne, gridir(e), gridere, alter. of gridel griddle]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

gridiron

The football field, marked with white lines.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gridiron - a cooking utensil of parallel metal barsgridiron - a cooking utensil of parallel metal bars; used to grill fish or meat
cooking utensil, cookware - a kitchen utensil made of material that does not melt easily; used for cooking
2.gridiron - the playing field on which football is playedgridiron - the playing field on which football is played
football stadium - a stadium where football games are held
athletic field, playing area, playing field, field - a piece of land prepared for playing a game; "the home crowd cheered when Princeton took the field"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

gridiron

[ˈgrɪdˌaɪən] N
1. (Culin) → parrilla f
2. (US) (Sport) → campo m de fútbol (americano)
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

gridiron

[ˈgrɪdaɪərn] ngril m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

gridiron

n
(Cook) → (Brat)rost m
(US Ftbl) → Spielfeld nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

gridiron

[ˈgrɪdˌaɪən] ngraticola
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
So does the ironmongery - candle-boxes, and gridirons, and that sort of necessaries - because those things tell, and mount up.
"Or even," said he, "if you was helped to knocking her up a new chain for the front door - or say a gross or two of shark-headed screws for general use - or some light fancy article, such as a toasting-fork when she took her muffins - or a gridiron when she took a sprat or such like--"
I recognized it as one of two which had stood lashed against either rail of the Lady Jermyn's poop; there the bars had risen at right angles to the deck; now they lay horizontal, a gridiron six feet long-and my bed.
Now, though the said chicken was then at roost in the stable, and required the several ceremonies of catching, killing, and picking, before it was brought to the gridiron, my landlady would nevertheless have undertaken to do all within the time; but the guest, being unfortunately admitted behind the scenes, must have been witness to the fourberie ; the poor woman was therefore obliged to confess that she had none in the house; "but, madam," said she, "I can get any kind of mutton in an instant from the butcher's."
During these preparations his harangue was commented upon in no very measured terms; and one of the party, after denouncing him as a lying old son of a seacook who begrudged a fellow a few hours' liberty, exclaimed with an oath, 'But you don't bounce me out of my liberty, old chap, for all your yarns; for I would go ashore if every pebble on the beach was a live coal, and every stick a gridiron, and the cannibals stood ready to broil me on landing.'