griping


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gripe

 (grīp)
v. griped, grip·ing, gripes
v.intr.
1. Informal To complain naggingly or petulantly; grumble.
2. To have sharp pains in the bowels.
v.tr.
1. Informal To irritate; annoy: Her petty complaints really gripe me.
2. To cause sharp pain in the bowels of.
3. To grasp; seize.
4. To oppress or afflict.
n.
1. Informal A complaint.
2. gripes Sharp, spasmodic pains in the bowels.
3. A firm hold; a grasp.
4. A grip; a handle.

[Middle English gripen, to seize, from Old English grīpan.]

grip′er n.

griping

(ˈɡraɪpɪŋ)
n
informal the act of complaining
adj
sudden and intense: griping pains in her stomach.
ˈgripingly adv
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.griping - acute abdominal pain (especially in infants)
lead colic, painter's colic - symptom of chronic lead poisoning and associated with obstinate constipation
hurting, pain - a symptom of some physical hurt or disorder; "the patient developed severe pain and distension"
Translations

griping

[ˈgraɪpɪŋ]
A. ADJ [pain] → retortijante
B. Nquejadumbre f

griping

[ˈgraɪpɪŋ]
n (= complaining) → ronchonnements mpl
adj [pain] → lancinant(e)

griping

[ˈgraɪpɪŋ]
1. adj (pain) → lancinante
2. n (fam) (complaining) → lagne fpl, lamentele fpl
References in classic literature ?
So, almost every twenty-four hours, when the watches of the night were set, and the band on deck sentinelled the slumbers of the band below; and when if a rope was to be hauled upon the forecastle, the sailors flung it not rudely down, as by day, but with some cautiousness dropt it to its place, for fear of disturbing their slumbering shipmates; when this sort of steady quietude would begin to prevail, habitually, the silent steersman would watch the cabin-scuttle; and ere long the old man would emerge, griping at the iron banister, to help his crippled way.
This was, in fact, the case at present; for, notwithstanding all the confident assertions of the lad to the contrary, it is certain they were no more in the right road to Coventry, than the fraudulent, griping, cruel, canting miser is in the right road to heaven.
Maddison is a clever fellow; I do not wish to displace him, provided he does not try to displace me; but it would be simple to be duped by a man who has no right of creditor to dupe me, and worse than simple to let him give me a hard-hearted, griping fellow for a tenant, instead of an honest man, to whom I have given half a promise already.