grisaille

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gri·saille

 (grĭ-zī′, -zāl′)
n.
1. A style of monochromatic painting in shades of gray, used especially for the representation of relief sculpture.
2. A painting or design in this style.
3.
a. Vitrifiable glass paint.
b. A lacy pattern painted on light glass with vitrifiable paint and fired.

[French, from gris, gray, from Old French, from Frankish *grīs.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

grisaille

(ɡrɪˈzeɪl; French ɡrizɑj)
n
1. (Art Terms) a technique of monochrome painting in shades of grey, as in an oil painting or a wall decoration, imitating the effect of relief
2. (Art Terms) a painting, stained glass window, etc, in this manner
[C19: from French, from gris grey]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

gri•saille

(grɪˈzaɪ, -ˈzeɪl)

n.
monochromatic painting in shades of gray.
[1840–50; < French =gris gray + -aille n. suffix]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.grisaille - chiaroscuro painting or stained glass etc., in shades of grey imitating the effect of reliefgrisaille - chiaroscuro painting or stained glass etc., in shades of grey imitating the effect of relief
chiaroscuro - a monochrome picture made by using several different shades of the same color
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Therewere fifteen of them in the show--nine grisailles and six featuring pale, almost evanescent colors--all made, it seems, by using found crocheted blankets as templates.
(1) The ephemeral reliefs, grisailles and statues which were exhibited during the processions celebrating the wedding of Francesco I de' Medici, son of Cosimo I, and Joanna of Austria, daughter of Ferdinand I, in 1565-66, are cases in point.