grockle

grockle

(ˈɡrɒkəl)
n
dialect Southwest English a tourist, esp one from the Midlands or the North of England
[C20: of unknown origin]
References in periodicals archive ?
alleyway), "grockle" (a tourist), "far-welted" (describing a sheep on its
She falls foul of two influential classmates, Clare and Ella, is labelled a stuck-up grockle, and is mercilessly bullied.
- GROCKLE WE WERE overrun in midfield for much of the second half but hung on for a massive, massive victory.
After Korky, Desperate Dan and Keyhole Kate, kids met Jimmy and His Grockle, an amiable little dragon, "The queerest beast to walk on land, Jimmy's Grockle beats the band." Beneath each drawing, a 100 or so words.
His attention was caught by a tiny shop window full of trinkets and tourist-catchers, a grockle shop they called it at home, and in spite of the urgency imparted by Faulds, he stooped for a closer look.
In our own West Country, meanwhile, "grockle" is the disparaging term used by many to describe visitors to the area.
In the week leading up to Christmas, entertainers Bo Clown, Dame Dilly Grockle, SnoBo and balloon artists Christmas Crackers and Krazy Kev will mingle with shoppers in South Shields, Jarrow and Hebburn.
In that first Dandy, after finishing with Korky, Dan and Keyhole Kate, you met Jimmy and his Grockle. The Grockle, a miniature dragon, helped Jimmy through life, mainly by setting bullies trousers alight with is fire-belching breath.
Tourists are affectionately known as 'emmets' here in Cornwall--the more pejorative word 'grockle' is used in Devon.
They show their disgust for the summer visitor, which is the main source of their income, by calling them "emmets", definitely far more insulting than the endearing "grockle" used elsewhere on the south coast.
IFthe gentleman in your joke was visiting Devon he would indeed be a grockle but as he was in Cornwall he would be an emmet.