grockle

(redirected from grockles)

grockle

(ˈɡrɒkəl)
n
dialect Southwest English a tourist, esp one from the Midlands or the North of England
[C20: of unknown origin]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
And, because language is constantly evolving, the exhibition also features completely new words and phrases, such as 'elephant's ears' to describe naan bread, grockles - tourists - and soogie; a long, hot, bubble bath.
If snobby grockles want to enjoy the beauty they have to make do with what's around."
Crawford Logan was the characterful reciter, his overmiking unbalancing the sound-picture, and drawing too much attention to these verses (one of which, describing a visit to the local tip which could be happening anywhere, seemed inappropriate) which could possibly be offensive to genuine foresters refusing to be patronised by incoming grockles.
I think this is deliberate - a cunning way to deter grockles by making the British seaside appear so dull that townies will stay at home.
It rained on Cardiff and Bridgend, also Neath and Swansea, and as we approached Llanelli - a town so named to enable the Welsh to tell visiting grockles "that is not how you pronounce the place" - it rained with increased urgency.
So despite the speculation about the right to roam, I doubt you'll wake up to find a gathering of grockles in your front garden.
It is so infinitely more than the bikini-clad, tanning-oil, bouzouki-dancing experience that so many package tourists (or grockles, as we call them here in the West of England) suppose.
The county, one of the poorest in England, has an army of seasonal workers dependent on the summer income from "grockles" - tourists.
There is bunting hanging from every cottage on the harbour and incomers (grockles as they are called here) and locals alike are discussing winds and tides and bearings - all of which I know nothing about.
But this is the domain of the New Forest ponies, which have right of way down the little high streets, and which attract thousands of tourists (or 'grockles' as we're known to the locals) every year.