grossness


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gross

 (grōs)
adj. gross·er, gross·est
1.
a. Exclusive of deductions; total: gross profits. See Synonyms at whole.
b. Unmitigated in any way; utter: gross incompetence.
2. So obvious or conspicuous as to cause or heighten offense: gross injustice. See Synonyms at flagrant.
3.
a. Brutishly coarse, as in behavior; crude: "It is futile to expect a hungry and squalid population to be anything but violent and gross" (Thomas H. Huxley).
b. Disgusting or offensive: Don't you think slugs are gross? He told a gross joke.
4. Overweight; corpulent: "Sally is fat. She is gross. She must weigh twelve stone and more" (Margaret Drabble).
5.
a. On a large scale; not fine or detailed: gross anatomical similarities; gross motor skills.
b. Broad; general: the gross necessities of life.
n.
1. pl. gross·es The entire body or amount, as of income, before necessary deductions have been made.
2. pl. gross Abbr. gr. or gro. A group of 144 items; 12 dozen.
tr.v. grossed, gross·ing, gross·es
To earn as a total income or profit before deductions: The store grossed $10,000 last month.
Phrasal Verb:
gross out Slang
To fill with disgust; nauseate: "The trick in making a family film ... is finding ways to interest grown-ups without boring, confusing, or grossing out the younger set" (David Sterritt).

[Middle English, large, from Old French gros, from Late Latin grossus, thick. N., sense 2, Middle English grosse, from Old French grosse (douzain), large (dozen), feminine of gros.]

gross′er n.
gross′ly adv.
gross′ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.grossness - the quality of lacking taste and refinementgrossness - the quality of lacking taste and refinement
inelegance - the quality of lacking refinement and good taste

grossness

noun
Translations

grossness

[ˈgrəʊsnɪs] N
1. (= fatness) → obesidad f, gordura f
2. (= seriousness) [of crime, abuse] → crudeza f
3. (= tastelessness) [of joke, language, behaviour] → ordinariez f

grossness

n
(= seriousness, of error, insult, exaggeration, simplification) → Grobheit f; (of inequality, violation)Krassheit f; (of negligence, injustice)ungeheures Ausmaß
(= fatness)Körperfülle f, → Fettheit f
(inf) (= disgusting nature)abstoßende Art; (= tastelessness)ordinäre Art
References in classic literature ?
It was all in the other quarter that, after a lull, the grossness broke out.
How I should like to describe her--just to see what a holy indignation I could stir up in the world--just to hear the unreflecting average man deliver himself about my grossness and coarseness, and all that.
The life he described had a charm, an easy gaiety, in which was no grossness.
However ridiculous it may seem to you that I was expecting to win at roulette, I look upon the generally accepted opinion concerning the folly and the grossness of hoping to win at gambling as a thing even more absurd.
They inherit, too, a fund of civility and complaisance; and, instead of that hardness and grossness which men in laborious life are apt to indulge towards each other, they are mutually obliging and accommodating; interchanging kind offices, yielding each other assistance and comfort in every emergency, and using the familiar appellations of "cousin" and "brother" when there is in fact no relationship.
I will not pretend that I was insensible to the grossness of the poet's time, which I found often enough in the poet's verse, as well as the goodness of his nature, and my father seems to have felt a certain misgiving about it.
The delicacy of your sex cannot conceive the grossness of ours, nor how little one sort of amour has to do with the heart.
By those best acquainted with his habits, the paleness of the young minister's cheek was accounted for by his too earnest devotion to study, his scrupulous fulfilment of parochial duty, and more than all, to the fasts and vigils of which he made a frequent practice, in order to keep the grossness of this earthly state from clogging and obscuring his spiritual lamp.
Angel Clare was far from all that she thought him in this respect; absurdly far, indeed; but he was, in truth, more spiritual than animal; he had himself well in hand, and was singularly free from grossness.
It was a soul- possession he dreamed, refined beyond any grossness, a free comradeship of spirit that he could not put into definite thought.
spoke up the fourth man, a huge-bulking, colossal- bodied, greasy-seeming grossness of flesh--the Armenian Jew and San Francisco pawnbroker the previous steward had warned Daughtry about.
Will that effect nothing, think you, towards purging away the grossness out of human life?