ground elder


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ground elder

n
(Plants) another name for goutweed
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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They are usually engulfed in a blanket of ground elder - the bane of my cottage garden.
Zap tough perennials such as docks, dandelions, horsetail, ground elder and nettles with glyphosate-free Roundup Speed Ultra weed killer.
We're foraging for ingredients to cook dinner over a fire in the forest of Ormanas, Skane County, searching for the jagged leaves of ground elder, the freshest-looking dandelions, bright flowers of yellow archangels, liquorice-heavy chervil and wonderfully garlicky ramson, amongst many other delectable herbs I would ordinarily have trampled over.
GROUND ELDER This rampant, vigorous perennial weed spreads quickly between cultivated plants, forming clumps of green, lobed leaves and heads of creamy white flowers in summer, competing for nutrients and light with your favourite plants.
| GROUND ELDER THIS rampant weed spreads quickly between cultivated plants, forming clumps of green, lobed leaves and heads of creamy white flowers in summer.
She talked about filling"the hungry gap,"the time before the first of this year's produce appears, by foraging for nettles and ground elder and turning these into delicious soup.
"It is important for farmers and indeed for those of us seeking to deal with ground elder and other weeds.
| KEEP on top of weeding and pay particular attention to pernicious weeds such as bindweed and ground elder.
They're easy to pull out but it's at this time of year, when beds and borders have been cleared of debris, that the first leaves and shoots of marauding couch grass and ground elder come into plain sight.
This can prove difficult with plants like dandelions which have long tap roots and some of the most invasive and difficult to eradicate weeds are perennials - bindweeds, horsetail, ground elder and Japanese knotweed.
My new allotment is covered in weeds like ground elder and nettles.
I draw the line at ground elder and horsetail, the stubborn intruder that resists (even seems to relish) all attempts at eradication: kill one, as another saying goes, and five more will come to the funeral.