ground rent


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ground rent

n. Chiefly British
Rent paid for land to be used chiefly for building.

ground rent

n
(Law) law the rent reserved by a lessor on granting a lease, esp one for a long period of years

ground′ rent`


n.
the rent at which land is let to a tenant either for a long term or perpetually.
[1660–70]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ground rent - payment for the right to occupy and improve a piece of land
rent - a payment or series of payments made by the lessee to an owner for use of some property, facility, equipment, or service
Translations

ground rent

n (Brit) → canone m di affitto di un terreno
References in periodicals archive ?
As there will be no leases, there is no scope for reservation of a ground rent in favour of the developer.
Ackman would not reveal the ground rent, but other real estate sources pegged it at under $1 million until at least 2011, when there is a 15-year renewal and rent reset.
The helpline was set up after scores of people contacted the Examiner over extra charges for unpaid ground rent bills.
A good range of ground rent investments, which have traditionally been popular in the auction room, are also included in the March catalogue.
Although the government's spokesperson and the Kaduna State Property Development Agency have tried to rationalise the demolition exercise that has been roundly condemned by all and sundry, claiming certain contraventions of town planning rules and regulations, including the non-payment of ground rent, the defences are a hollow and only smack of bilious vindictiveness.
The meeting was informed that a formal allotment letter could not be issued due to an outstanding annual ground rent of Rs84 million against the army.
We have started work on file work to waive the annual ground rent as it was the CDA's fault not to hand over the possession of the land to the army after its lease years ago.
It would therefore seem a little ironic if legislation was brought in to protect leaseholders in England only for Welsh-based leaseholders to be left open to possible eye-watering hikes in their ground rent.
A formal allotment letter has not been issued due to an outstanding annual ground rent of Rs84 million.
But small print clauses can double ground rent every 10 years, that's 16 times after 40 years turning an affordable PS400 a year into PS6,400 - and that's on top of mortgages, council tax, insurance and maintenance.
Why should property developers be allowed to charge a ground rent when leaseholders, having already paid a market price for their leases, get nothing in return?