grounding

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ground 1

 (ground)
n.
1.
a. The solid surface of the earth.
b. The floor of a body of water, especially the sea.
2. Soil; earth: level the ground for a lawn.
3. often grounds An area of land designated for a particular purpose: a burial ground; parade grounds.
4. often grounds The land surrounding or forming part of a house or another building: a guesthouse on the grounds of the mansion.
5. An area or a position that is contested in or as if in battle: The soldiers held their ground against the enemy. Character witnesses helped the defendant stand her ground in the trial.
6. Something that serves as a foundation or means of attachment for something else: a ground of white paint under the mural.
7. A surrounding area; a background.
8. often grounds The foundation for an argument, belief, or action; a basis.
9. often grounds The underlying condition prompting an action; a cause: grounds for suspicion; a ground for divorce. See Synonyms at base1.
10. An area of reference or discussion; a subject: The professor covered new ground in every lecture.
11. grounds
a. The sediment at or from the bottom of a liquid: coffee grounds.
b. Particles of ground coffee beans for use in making coffee for drinking.
12. Electricity
a. A large conducting body, such as the earth or an electric circuit connected to the earth, used as an arbitrary zero of potential.
b. A conducting object, such as a wire, that is connected to such a position of zero potential.
13. A mesh background upon which patterns are worked in lace-making.
v. ground·ed, ground·ing, grounds
v.tr.
1. To place on or cause to touch the ground.
2. To provide a basis for (a theory, for example); justify.
3. To supply with basic information; instruct in fundamentals.
4.
a. To prevent (an aircraft or a pilot) from flying.
b. Informal To restrict (someone) especially to a certain place as a punishment.
5. Electricity To connect (an electric circuit) to a ground.
6. Nautical To run (a vessel) aground.
7.
a. Baseball To hit (a ball) onto the ground.
b. Football To throw (a ball) to the ground in order to stop play and avoid being tackled behind the line of scrimmage.
v.intr.
1. To touch or reach the ground.
2. Baseball To hit a ground ball: grounded to the second baseman.
3. Nautical To run aground.
Phrasal Verb:
ground out Baseball
To be put out by hitting a ground ball that is fielded and thrown to first base.
Idioms:
drive/run into the ground
To belabor (an issue or a subject).
from the ground up
From the most basic level to the highest level; completely: designed the house from the ground up; learned the family business from the ground up.
off the ground
Under way, as if in flight: Because of legal difficulties, the construction project never got off the ground.
on (one's) own ground
In a situation where one has knowledge or competence: a sculptor back on her own ground after experiments with painting.
on the ground
At a place that is exciting, interesting, or important: a reporter who wanted to be on the ground when the story broke.
to ground
1. Into a den or burrow: a fox going to ground.
2. Into hiding.

[Middle English, from Old English grund.]

ground 2

 (ground)
v.
Past tense and past participle of grind.

grounding

(ˈɡraʊndɪŋ)
n
a basic knowledge of or training in a subject

grounding

The bonding of an equipment case, frame or chassis, to an object or vehicle structure to ensure a common potential. See also bonding; earthing.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.grounding - education or instruction in the fundamentals of a field of knowledge; "he lacks the foundation necessary for advanced study"; "a good grounding in mathematics"
education - knowledge acquired by learning and instruction; "it was clear that he had a very broad education"
2.grounding - fastening electrical equipment to earth
fastening, attachment - the act of fastening things together

grounding

noun coaching, schooling, teaching, instruction, education, guidance, tuition The degree provides a thorough grounding in both mathematics and statistics.
Translations
تأسيس، تعليم الأسُس
vyučování základům
grundviden
grunnur, kennsla
temel eğitim/öğretim

grounding

[ˈgraʊndɪŋ] N
1. (Naut) → varada f
2. (in education) → conocimientos mpl básicos
to give sb a grounding inenseñar a algn los rudimentos de

grounding

[ˈgraʊndɪŋ] n (in subject)connaissances fpl de base
a grounding in biology → des connaissances de base en biologie

grounding

n
(= basic knowledge)Grundwissen nt; to give somebody a grounding in Englishjdm die Grundlagen pldes Englischen beibringen
(Aviat, of plane) → Startverbot nt(of für); (due to strike, bad weather) → Hinderung fam Start; (of pilot)Sperren nt

grounding

[ˈgraʊndɪŋ] n (educational) → fondamento, basi fpl
he has a good grounding in French → ha delle buone basi in francese

ground2

(graund) noun
1. the solid surface of the Earth. lying on the ground; high ground.
2. a piece of land used for some purpose. a football ground.
verb
1. to base. His argument is grounded on a series of wrong assumptions.
2. to (cause a ship to) hit the seabed or shore and remain stuck.
3. to prevent (an aeroplane, pilot) from flying. All planes have been grounded because of the fog.
ˈgrounding noun
the teaching of the basic facts of a subject. a good grounding in mathematics.
ˈgroundless adjective
without reason. Your fears are groundless.
grounds noun plural
1. the garden or land round a large house etc. the castle grounds.
2. good reasons. Have you any grounds for calling him a liar?
3. the powder which remains in a cup (eg of coffee) which one has drunk. coffee grounds.
ground floor
the rooms of a building which are at street level. My office is on the ground floor; (also adjective) a ground-floor flat.
groundnutpeanutˈgroundwork noun
work done in preparation for beginning a project etc.
break new ground
to deal with a subject for the first time.
cover ground
to deal with a certain amount of work etc. We've covered a lot of ground at this morning's meeting.
get (something) off the ground
to get (a project etc) started.
hold one's ground
to refuse to move back or retreat when attacked. Although many were killed, the soldiers held their ground.
lose ground
to (be forced to) move back or retreat. The general sent in reinforcements when he saw that his troops were losing ground.
References in classic literature ?
It warn't the grounding -- that didn't keep us back but a little.
As they did not wish to land in this place the boy cut the rope with his pocket-knife and set the fish free, just in time to prevent the raft from grounding.
The tide was half out, and they sailed squarely in on the sand, grounding in a row, with the salmon boat in the middle.
They talked on; she, in her gently persistent way, returning always to the need of thorough grounding in education and to the advantages of Latin as part of the foundation for any career.
Taft's beds were three miles away, and for a long time we rowed silently in the wake of the other boats, once in a while grounding and our oar blades constantly striking bottom.
But all that is gone in a few weeks, and the wild winter locks down again on the land; while at sea the ice tears up and down the offing, jamming and ramming, and splitting and hitting, and pounding and grounding, till it all freezes together, ten feet thick, from the land outward to deep water.
The wind, though it had fallen from its earlier violence, was still blowing strongly enough to render the grounding of so clumsy a mass extremely dangerous, even if it had been desirable for the Prince to land in inhabited country, and so risk capture.
Clara, in the course of her incursions into those artistic circles which were the highest within her reach, discovered that her conversational qualifications were expected to include a grounding in the novels of Mr.
In the first stage, the actual layout of the GD, the corrosion state and the section of horizontal groundings (HG) are determined, the vertical electrical sensing (VES) is carried out and the electrical parameters of the GD are measured for further calculation.
On Secular and Theistic Groundings of Human Rights.
Groundings account for 18% of the total number of ship losses (World Casualty Statistics 2007).
Bishop Pedro Arigo of Palawan said the grounding of the Ming Long Yu was an unfortunate incident and called on the government to tighten security in the marine sanctuary to prevent groundings of foreign vessels on the reefs.