grounds


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ground 1

 (ground)
n.
1.
a. The solid surface of the earth.
b. The floor of a body of water, especially the sea.
2. Soil; earth: level the ground for a lawn.
3. often grounds An area of land designated for a particular purpose: a burial ground; parade grounds.
4. often grounds The land surrounding or forming part of a house or another building: a guesthouse on the grounds of the mansion.
5. An area or a position that is contested in or as if in battle: The soldiers held their ground against the enemy. Character witnesses helped the defendant stand her ground in the trial.
6. Something that serves as a foundation or means of attachment for something else: a ground of white paint under the mural.
7. A surrounding area; a background.
8. often grounds The foundation for an argument, belief, or action; a basis.
9. often grounds The underlying condition prompting an action; a cause: grounds for suspicion; a ground for divorce. See Synonyms at base1.
10. An area of reference or discussion; a subject: The professor covered new ground in every lecture.
11. grounds
a. The sediment at or from the bottom of a liquid: coffee grounds.
b. Particles of ground coffee beans for use in making coffee for drinking.
12. Electricity
a. A large conducting body, such as the earth or an electric circuit connected to the earth, used as an arbitrary zero of potential.
b. A conducting object, such as a wire, that is connected to such a position of zero potential.
13. A mesh background upon which patterns are worked in lace-making.
v. ground·ed, ground·ing, grounds
v.tr.
1. To place on or cause to touch the ground.
2. To provide a basis for (a theory, for example); justify.
3. To supply with basic information; instruct in fundamentals.
4.
a. To prevent (an aircraft or a pilot) from flying.
b. Informal To restrict (someone) especially to a certain place as a punishment.
5. Electricity To connect (an electric circuit) to a ground.
6. Nautical To run (a vessel) aground.
7.
a. Baseball To hit (a ball) onto the ground.
b. Football To throw (a ball) to the ground in order to stop play and avoid being tackled behind the line of scrimmage.
v.intr.
1. To touch or reach the ground.
2. Baseball To hit a ground ball: grounded to the second baseman.
3. Nautical To run aground.
Phrasal Verb:
ground out Baseball
To be put out by hitting a ground ball that is fielded and thrown to first base.
Idioms:
drive/run into the ground
To belabor (an issue or a subject).
from the ground up
From the most basic level to the highest level; completely: designed the house from the ground up; learned the family business from the ground up.
off the ground
Under way, as if in flight: Because of legal difficulties, the construction project never got off the ground.
on (one's) own ground
In a situation where one has knowledge or competence: a sculptor back on her own ground after experiments with painting.
on the ground
At a place that is exciting, interesting, or important: a reporter who wanted to be on the ground when the story broke.
to ground
1. Into a den or burrow: a fox going to ground.
2. Into hiding.

[Middle English, from Old English grund.]

ground 2

 (ground)
v.
Past tense and past participle of grind.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.grounds - your basis for belief or disbeliefgrounds - your basis for belief or disbelief; knowledge on which to base belief; "the evidence that smoking causes lung cancer is very compelling"
information - knowledge acquired through study or experience or instruction
probable cause - (law) evidence sufficient to warrant an arrest or search and seizure; "a magistrate determined that there was probable cause to search the house"
cogent evidence, proof - any factual evidence that helps to establish the truth of something; "if you have any proof for what you say, now is the time to produce it"
disproof, falsification, refutation - any evidence that helps to establish the falsity of something
track, trail, lead - evidence pointing to a possible solution; "the police are following a promising lead"; "the trail led straight to the perpetrator"
symptom - (medicine) any sensation or change in bodily function that is experienced by a patient and is associated with a particular disease
sign - (medicine) any objective evidence of the presence of a disorder or disease; "there were no signs of asphyxiation"
2.grounds - the enclosed land around a house or other building; "it was a small house with almost no yard"
backyard - the grounds in back of a house
dooryard - a yard outside the front or rear door of a house
front yard - the yard in front of a house; between the house and the street
garden - a yard or lawn adjoining a house
playground - yard consisting of an outdoor area for children's play
side yard - the grounds at either side of a house
field - a piece of land cleared of trees and usually enclosed; "he planted a field of wheat"
3.grounds - a tract of land cleared for some special purposes (recreation or burial etc.)
4.grounds - a justification for something existing or happening; "he had no cause to complain"; "they had good reason to rejoice"
justification - a statement in explanation of some action or belief
5.grounds - dregs consisting of solid particles (especially of coffee) that form a residue; "it is a Middle Eastern custom to read your future in your coffee grounds"
coffee grounds - the dregs remaining after brewing coffee
dregs, settlings - sediment that has settled at the bottom of a liquid
Translations
أسباب جيدهالأرض أو الحديقَه المحيطة بالحِصنثُفْل
důvodyparkpozemkysedlina
god grundgrumshaveanlægpark
zacc
ástæîurkorgurlóî
dôvody

ground2

(graund) noun
1. the solid surface of the Earth. lying on the ground; high ground.
2. a piece of land used for some purpose. a football ground.
verb
1. to base. His argument is grounded on a series of wrong assumptions.
2. to (cause a ship to) hit the seabed or shore and remain stuck.
3. to prevent (an aeroplane, pilot) from flying. All planes have been grounded because of the fog.
ˈgrounding noun
the teaching of the basic facts of a subject. a good grounding in mathematics.
ˈgroundless adjective
without reason. Your fears are groundless.
grounds noun plural
1. the garden or land round a large house etc. the castle grounds.
2. good reasons. Have you any grounds for calling him a liar?
3. the powder which remains in a cup (eg of coffee) which one has drunk. coffee grounds.
ground floor
the rooms of a building which are at street level. My office is on the ground floor; (also adjective) a ground-floor flat.
groundnutpeanutˈgroundwork noun
work done in preparation for beginning a project etc.
break new ground
to deal with a subject for the first time.
cover ground
to deal with a certain amount of work etc. We've covered a lot of ground at this morning's meeting.
get (something) off the ground
to get (a project etc) started.
hold one's ground
to refuse to move back or retreat when attacked. Although many were killed, the soldiers held their ground.
lose ground
to (be forced to) move back or retreat. The general sent in reinforcements when he saw that his troops were losing ground.
References in classic literature ?
WHILE Captain Bonneville and his men are sojourning among the Nez Perces, on Salmon River, we will inquire after the fortunes of those doughty rivals of the Rocky Mountains and American Fur Companies, who started off for the trapping grounds to the north-northwest.
The great mass in the middle are the players-up, both sides mingled together; they are hanging their jackets (and all who mean real work), their hats, waistcoats, neck- handkerchiefs, and braces, on the railings round the small trees; and there they go by twos and threes up to their respective grounds. There is none of the colour and tastiness of get-up, you will perceive, which lends such a life to the present game at Rugby, making the dullest and worst-fought match a pretty sight.
of them are occasions in which a sailor, without dishonour, may well wish himself dead; and I have no doubt that of those who had the experience of their ship taking the ground, 90 per cent.
Ground which can be freely traversed by both sides is called accessible.
When they had done this, they cleaned all the tables and seats with sponges and water, while Telemachus and the two others shovelled up the blood and dirt from the ground, and the women carried it all away and put it out of doors.
By this time the plane was moving along the ground and even then Usanga was upon the verge of leaping out, and would have done so had he been able to unfasten the strap from about his waist.
David wanted to play on a pitch near the Round Pond with which he is familiar, but this would have placed me at a disadvantage, so I insisted on unaccustomed ground, and we finally pitched stumps in the Figs.
Morgan said that our best ground was beyond a certain ridge that he pointed out, and we crossed it by a trail through the chaparral.
Neither do I reckon it an ill seat, only where the air is unwholesome; but likewise where the air is unequal; as you shall see many fine seats set upon a knap of ground, environed with higher hills round about it; whereby the heat of the sun is pent in, and the wind gathereth as in troughs; so as you shall have, and that suddenly, as great diversity of heat and cold as if you dwelt in several places.
The Mountains of the Moon.--An Ocean of Verdure.--They cast Anchor.--The Towing Elephant.--A Running Fire.--Death of the Monster.--The Field-Oven.--A Meal on the Grass.--A Night on the Ground.
We laid it under ground, of course, and it was all finished in a couple of hours or so.
The son of Telamon now struck him under the ear with a spear which he then drew back again, and Imbrius fell headlong as an ash-tree when it is felled on the crest of some high mountain beacon, and its delicate green foliage comes toppling down to the ground. Thus did he fall with his bronze-dight armour ringing harshly round him, and Teucer sprang forward with intent to strip him of his armour; but as he was doing so, Hector took aim at him with a spear.