grub

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grub

 (grŭb)
v. grubbed, grub·bing, grubs
v.tr.
1. To dig up by or as if by the roots: grubbed carrots with a stick.
2. To clear of roots and stumps by digging: grubbed a small plot.
3. Slang To obtain by importunity: grub a cigarette.
v.intr.
1. To dig in the earth: grub for potatoes.
2.
a. To search laboriously by or as if by digging; rummage.
b. To toil arduously; drudge: grub for a living.
n.
1. The thick wormlike larva of certain beetles and other insects.
2. A drudge.
3. Slang Food.

[Middle English grubben, from Old English *grybban; see ghrebh- in Indo-European roots.]

grub′ber n.

grub

(ɡrʌb)
vb, grubs, grubbing or grubbed
1. (when: tr, often foll by up or out) to search for and pull up (roots, stumps, etc) by digging in the ground
2. to dig up the surface of (ground, soil, etc), esp to clear away roots, stumps, etc
3. (intr; often foll by in or among) to search carefully
4. (intr) to work unceasingly, esp at a dull task or research
5. slang to provide (a person) with food or (of a person) to take food
6. (tr) slang chiefly US to scrounge: to grub a cigarette.
n
7. (Zoology) the short legless larva of certain insects, esp beetles
8. slang food; victuals
9. a person who works hard, esp in a dull plodding way
10. informal Brit a dirty child
[C13: of Germanic origin; compare Old High German grubilōn to dig, German grübeln to rack one's brain, Middle Dutch grobben to scrape together; see grave3, groove]

grub

(grʌb)

n., v. grubbed, grub•bing. n.
1. the thick-bodied, sluggish larva of certain insects, esp. the beetle.
2. an unkempt person.
3. Slang. food; victuals.
4. a drudge.
v.t.
5. to dig; clear of roots, stumps, etc.
6. to dig up by the roots; uproot (often fol. by up or out).
7. Slang. to supply with food.
8. Slang. to scrounge.
v.i.
9. to dig; search by or as if by digging.
10. to lead a laborious or groveling life; drudge.
11. to engage in laborious study.
[1250–1300; Middle English; akin to Old High German grubilōn to dig, Old Norse gryfia hole, pit]
grub′ber, n.

grub


Past participle: grubbed
Gerund: grubbing

Imperative
grub
grub
Present
I grub
you grub
he/she/it grubs
we grub
you grub
they grub
Preterite
I grubbed
you grubbed
he/she/it grubbed
we grubbed
you grubbed
they grubbed
Present Continuous
I am grubbing
you are grubbing
he/she/it is grubbing
we are grubbing
you are grubbing
they are grubbing
Present Perfect
I have grubbed
you have grubbed
he/she/it has grubbed
we have grubbed
you have grubbed
they have grubbed
Past Continuous
I was grubbing
you were grubbing
he/she/it was grubbing
we were grubbing
you were grubbing
they were grubbing
Past Perfect
I had grubbed
you had grubbed
he/she/it had grubbed
we had grubbed
you had grubbed
they had grubbed
Future
I will grub
you will grub
he/she/it will grub
we will grub
you will grub
they will grub
Future Perfect
I will have grubbed
you will have grubbed
he/she/it will have grubbed
we will have grubbed
you will have grubbed
they will have grubbed
Future Continuous
I will be grubbing
you will be grubbing
he/she/it will be grubbing
we will be grubbing
you will be grubbing
they will be grubbing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been grubbing
you have been grubbing
he/she/it has been grubbing
we have been grubbing
you have been grubbing
they have been grubbing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been grubbing
you will have been grubbing
he/she/it will have been grubbing
we will have been grubbing
you will have been grubbing
they will have been grubbing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been grubbing
you had been grubbing
he/she/it had been grubbing
we had been grubbing
you had been grubbing
they had been grubbing
Conditional
I would grub
you would grub
he/she/it would grub
we would grub
you would grub
they would grub
Past Conditional
I would have grubbed
you would have grubbed
he/she/it would have grubbed
we would have grubbed
you would have grubbed
they would have grubbed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.grub - informal terms for a mealgrub - informal terms for a meal    
fare - the food and drink that are regularly served or consumed
2.grub - a soft thick wormlike larva of certain beetles and other insects
larva - the immature free-living form of most invertebrates and amphibians and fish which at hatching from the egg is fundamentally unlike its parent and must metamorphose
maggot - the larva of the housefly and blowfly commonly found in decaying organic matter
leatherjacket - tough-skinned larva of certain crane flies
Verb1.grub - ask for and get free; be a parasite
obtain - come into possession of; "How did you obtain the visa?"
freeload - live off somebody's generosity; "This young man refuses to work and is freeloading"
2.grub - search about busily
look for, search, seek - try to locate or discover, or try to establish the existence of; "The police are searching for clues"; "They are searching for the missing man in the entire county"

grub

noun
1. larva, maggot, caterpillar The grubs do their damage by tunnelling through ripened fruit.
2. (Slang) food, feed, rations, tack (informal), eats (slang), kai (N.Z. informal), sustenance, nosh (slang), victuals, nosebag (slang), vittles (obsolete or dialect) Get yourself some grub and come and sit down.
verb
1. search, hunt, scour, ferret, rummage, forage, fossick (Austral. & N.Z.) grubbing through piles of paper for his address
2. dig, search, root (informal), probe, burrow, rootle (Brit.) chickens grubbing around in the dirt for food

grub

verb
1. To break, turn over, or remove (earth or sand, for example) with or as if with a tool:
2. To do tedious, laborious, and sometimes menial work:
Informal: grind.
noun
1. One who works or toils tirelessly:
Informal: grind, workhorse.
2. Slang. Something fit to be eaten:
Slang: chow, eats.
Translations
أكْل، طَعامدودَةدودَة بَيضاءيَبحَث عَن الطعام
larvarýtbaštajídlo
larveormrodeædelse
murkinasapuskatoukka
ličinka
feltúrhernyókaja
grafa, rótalirfa, maîkurmatur, æti
地虫
음식
ėdalasknistilerva
kūniņarakņātiesrijamais
hranaličinka
käk
ตัวอ่อนของแมลง
eşip çıkarmakkurtlarvasürfetırtıl
ấu trùng

grub

[grʌb]
A. N
1. (= larva) → larva f, gusano m
2. (= food) → comida f
grub('s) up!¡la comida está servida!
B. VI to grub about in the earth for sthremover la tierra buscando algo
C. CPD Grub Street N (Brit) el mundillo de los escritores desconocidos
grub up VT + ADVarrancar, desarraigar; (= discover) → desenterrar

grub

[ˈgrʌb] n
(= insect) → larve f
(= food) → bouffe f
grub up
vt sep [+ hedge, plant] → déterrer

grub

n
(= larva)Larve f
(inf: = food) → Fressalien pl (hum inf), → Futterage f (inf); grub(’s) up!antreten zum Essenfassen (inf)
vt (animal) ground, soilaufwühlen, wühlen in (+dat)
vi (also grub about or around, pig) → wühlen (→ in in +dat); (person)(herum)kramen, (herum)wühlen (→ in in +dat, → for nach)

grub

[grʌb] n
a. (larva) → bruco
b. (fam) (food) → roba da mangiare
grub('s) up! → si mangia!, a tavola!

grub

(grab) noun
1. the form of an insect after it hatches from its egg. A caterpillar is a grub.
2. a slang term for food. Is there any grub in the house?
verbpast tense, past participle grubbed
to search by digging. The pigs were grubbing around for roots.

grub

دودَة larva larve Larve κάμπια larva murkina larve ličinka larva 地虫 음식 larve larve żarcie larva личинка käk ตัวอ่อนของแมลง yemek ấu trùng 幼虫
References in classic literature ?
That he could, with relish, eat raw meat that had been buried by himself weeks before, and enjoy small rodents and disgusting grubs, seems to us who have been always "civilized" a revolting fact; but had we learned in childhood to eat these things, and had we seen all those about us eat them, they would seem no more sickening to us now than do many of our greatest dainties, at which a savage African cannibal would look with repugnance and turn up his nose.
A cascade of Oddities, chips of broken comb, scale, fluff, and grubs slid out, crackled, sizzled, popped a little, and then the flames roared up and consumed all that fuel.
In an old abbey town, down in this part of the country, a long, long while ago--so long, that the story must be a true one, because our great-grandfathers implicitly believed it--there officiated as sexton and grave-digger in the churchyard, one Gabriel Grub. It by no means follows that because a man is a sexton, and constantly surrounded by the emblems of mortality, therefore he should be a morose and melancholy man; your undertakers are the merriest fellows in the world; and I once had the honour of being on intimate terms with a mute, who in private life, and off duty, was as comical and jocose a little fellow as ever chirped out a devil-may-care song, without a hitch in his memory, or drained off a good stiff glass without stopping for breath.
Grub for Selkirk--you think um plenty dog-grub stop Selkirk?"
But like the snout of the boar shall my word grub up the basis of your souls; a ploughshare will I be called by you.
Besides, there's going to be a famine, and every ounce of grub'll count.
The two men were compelled to run back to save the grub, upon which the huskies returned to the attack on the team.
"What gets me, Henry, is what a chap like this, that's a lord or something in his own country, and that's never had to bother about grub nor blankets; why he comes a-buttin' round the Godforsaken ends of the earth--that's what I can't exactly see."
"Grub. Of a larger appetite and more luck in satisfying it." His voice sounded harsh.
'Twas gettin' on towards fall, and grub was low, so Counahan ran her back to Boston, wid no more bones to ut."
"You catcha da job, I let you have mora da grub," the grocer assured Martin.
We would outfit our grub and water in the morning, hoist the big mainsail (which was a bigger piece of canvas than any I had ever sailed under), and beat our way out the estuary on the first of the seabreeze and the last of the ebb.