grunt

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grunt

 (grŭnt)
v. grunt·ed, grunt·ing, grunts
v.intr.
1. To utter a deep guttural sound, as a hog does.
2. To utter a sound similar to a grunt, as in disgust.
v.tr.
To utter or express with a deep guttural sound: He merely grunted his approval.
n.
1. A deep guttural sound.
2. Any of various chiefly tropical marine fishes of the family Haemulidae that produce a grunting sound by rubbing together their pharyngeal teeth.
3. Slang An infantryman in the US military, especially in the Vietnam War: "They were called grunts....They were the infantrymen, the foot soldiers of the war" (Bernard Edelman).
4. Slang One who performs routine or mundane tasks.
5. New England A dessert made by stewing fruit topped with pieces of biscuit dough, which steam as the fruit cooks. Also called slump.

[Middle English grunten, from Old English grunnettan; probably akin to grunnian, to make a loud noise, grunt, of imitative origin.]

grunt′er n.
grunt′ing·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

grunt

(ɡrʌnt)
vb
1. (Zoology) (intr) (esp of pigs and some other animals) to emit a low short gruff noise
2. (when tr, may take a clause as object) to express something gruffly: he grunted his answer.
n
3. the characteristic low short gruff noise of pigs, etc, or a similar sound, as of disgust
4. (Animals) any of various mainly tropical marine sciaenid fishes, such as Haemulon macrostomum (Spanish grunt), that utter a grunting sound when caught
5. (Military) slang US an infantry soldier or US Marine, esp in the Vietnam War
[Old English grunnettan, probably of imitative origin; compare Old High German grunnizōn, grunni moaning, Latin grunnīre]
ˈgruntingly adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

grunt

(grʌnt)

v.i.
1. to utter the deep, guttural sound characteristic of a hog.
2. to utter a similar sound.
3. to grumble, as in discontent.
v.t.
4. to express with a grunt.
n.
5. a sound of grunting.
6. any warm-water percoid fish of the family Pomadasyidae (Haemulidae), noted for emitting grunts.
7. a dessert of stewed fruit topped with biscuit dough.
8. Slang. an infantryman.
9. Slang. an unskilled worker; laborer.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English grunnettan, frequentative of grunian to grunt; c. Old High German grunnizōn]
grunt′er, n.
grunt′ing•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

grunt


Past participle: grunted
Gerund: grunting

Imperative
grunt
grunt
Present
I grunt
you grunt
he/she/it grunts
we grunt
you grunt
they grunt
Preterite
I grunted
you grunted
he/she/it grunted
we grunted
you grunted
they grunted
Present Continuous
I am grunting
you are grunting
he/she/it is grunting
we are grunting
you are grunting
they are grunting
Present Perfect
I have grunted
you have grunted
he/she/it has grunted
we have grunted
you have grunted
they have grunted
Past Continuous
I was grunting
you were grunting
he/she/it was grunting
we were grunting
you were grunting
they were grunting
Past Perfect
I had grunted
you had grunted
he/she/it had grunted
we had grunted
you had grunted
they had grunted
Future
I will grunt
you will grunt
he/she/it will grunt
we will grunt
you will grunt
they will grunt
Future Perfect
I will have grunted
you will have grunted
he/she/it will have grunted
we will have grunted
you will have grunted
they will have grunted
Future Continuous
I will be grunting
you will be grunting
he/she/it will be grunting
we will be grunting
you will be grunting
they will be grunting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been grunting
you have been grunting
he/she/it has been grunting
we have been grunting
you have been grunting
they have been grunting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been grunting
you will have been grunting
he/she/it will have been grunting
we will have been grunting
you will have been grunting
they will have been grunting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been grunting
you had been grunting
he/she/it had been grunting
we had been grunting
you had been grunting
they had been grunting
Conditional
I would grunt
you would grunt
he/she/it would grunt
we would grunt
you would grunt
they would grunt
Past Conditional
I would have grunted
you would have grunted
he/she/it would have grunted
we would have grunted
you would have grunted
they would have grunted
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.grunt - the short low gruff noise of the kind made by hogsgrunt - the short low gruff noise of the kind made by hogs
noise - sound of any kind (especially unintelligible or dissonant sound); "he enjoyed the street noises"; "they heard indistinct noises of people talking"; "during the firework display that ended the gala the noise reached 98 decibels"
2.grunt - an unskilled or low-ranking soldier or other worker; "infantrymen in Vietnam were called grunts"; "he went from grunt to chairman in six years"
unskilled person - a person who lacks technical training
3.grunt - medium-sized tropical marine food fishes that utter grunting sounds when caught
percoid, percoid fish, percoidean - any of numerous spiny-finned fishes of the order Perciformes
Haemulon album, margate - a grunt with a red mouth that is found from Florida to Brazil
Haemulon aurolineatum, tomtate - found off the West Indies and Florida
cottonwick, Haemulon malanurum - of warm Atlantic waters
Haemulon parra, sailors choice, sailor's-choice - a grunt found from Florida to Brazil and Gulf of Mexico
Anisotremus virginicus, porkfish, pork-fish - black and gold grunt found from Bermuda to Caribbean to Brazil
Anisotremus surinamensis, black margate, pompon - dusky grey food fish found from Louisiana and Florida southward
Orthopristis chrysopterus, pigfish, hogfish - found from Long Island southward
Verb1.grunt - issue a grunting, low, animal-like noise; "He grunted his reluctant approval"
let loose, let out, utter, emit - express audibly; utter sounds (not necessarily words); "She let out a big heavy sigh"; "He uttered strange sounds that nobody could understand"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

grunt

verb
To complain in low indistinct tones:
noun
A low indistinct utterance of complaint:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
قُباع الخنزير، همهمه، غمغمَهقُباع: صَوت الخنزيريُهَمهِمُ، يُغَمْغِمُ متذمرا
brbláníbrblatchrochtáníchrochtat
brummebrummengryntgrynte
röfög
rymjarÿtrÿta, rymja
kriuksėtisuniurnėti
ņurdēšanaņurdētrukšķēt
krochkať
hırıldamakhırıltıhomurdanmakhomurtu

grunt

[grʌnt]
A. N [of animal, person] → gruñido m
B. VI [animal, person] → gruñir
C. VT "yes," he grunted-sí -gruñó
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

grunt

[ˈgrʌnt]
vi
[person] → grogner
[animal] → grogner
vt [+ words] → grogner
n (= sound) [person] → grognement m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

grunt

n
(of animal, person)Grunzen nt no pl; (of pain, in exertion)Ächzen nt no pl, → Ächzer m (inf); to give a gruntgrunzen (→ of vor +dat), → ächzen (→ of vor +dat)
(US inf) → kleiner Angestellter, kleine Angestellte; (= dogsbody)Mädchen ntfür alles (inf)
vi (animal, person)grunzen; (with pain, exertion) → ächzen, aufseufzen; (in irritation) → knurren
vt replybrummen, knurren
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

grunt

[grʌnt]
1. ngrugnito
to give a grunt → emettere un grugnito
2. vigrugnire
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

grunt

(grant) verb
1. to make a low, rough sound. The pigs grunted when the farmer brought their food.
2. (of people) to say in a way that sounds like grunting. He grunted that he was too busy to talk to me.
noun
a low, rough sound. a grunt of disapproval.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

grunt

n gruñido; vi gruñir
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
`IF I don't take this child away with me,' thought Alice, `they're sure to kill it in a day or two: wouldn't it be murder to leave it behind?' She said the last words out loud, and the little thing grunted in reply (it had left off sneezing by this time).
The baby grunted again, and Alice looked very anxiously into its face to see what was the matter with it.
On one occasion when the shepherd laid hold of him, he grunted and squeaked and resisted violently.
Humph!" grunted the man as before; and once again Pollyanna laughed happily.
"Humph!" grunted the sick woman, eyeing her reflection severely.
He looked like a pig; he ate like a pig; he grunted like a pig.
Big Toomai heard him and grunted. "That thou shouldst never be one of these hill buffaloes of trackers.
He grunted once or twice and shifted his weight from one foreleg to the other, at the same time moving his head from side to side and swaying the ferns.
He grunted with a slight intonation of resentment, and that was all.
The boar, however, had not quite hidden himself, for his ears stuck out of the bush; and when he shook one of them a little, the cat, seeing something move, and thinking it was a mouse, sprang upon it, and bit and scratched it, so that the boar jumped up and grunted, and ran away, roaring out, 'Look up in the tree, there sits the one who is to blame.' So they looked up, and espied the wolf sitting amongst the branches; and they called him a cowardly rascal, and would not suffer him to come down till he was heartily ashamed of himself, and had promised to be good friends again with old Sultan.