guanethidine


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guanethidine

(ɡwəˈnɛθɪˌdiːn)
n
(Recreational Drugs) a drug, C10H22N4, that is used to reduce high blood pressure
Translations

guanethidine

n. guanetidina, agente usado en el tratamiento de la hipertensión.
References in periodicals archive ?
Acute iv blockade of the release of norepinephrine from peripheral sympathetic nerves with guanethidine or iv pretreatment with propranolol (a non-selective [beta]-adrenergic antagonist) abolished the effect of dipyrone on GE, suggesting the involvement of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS), and activation of [[beta].
Guanethidine is a norepinephrine inhibitor used intravenously in some European countries for nerve blocks to relieve complex pain syndrome, but in its radioisotope form, [sup.
2) intravenous regional anaesthesia with guanethidine depletes peripheral catecholamine and can relieve sympathetically maintained pain, intradermal injection of norepinephrine rekindles sympathetically maintained pain in patients who have previously undergone sympathectomy and topical application of clonidine has been shown to eliminate hyperalgesia only at the site of drug application.
Local anesthetics, guanethidine, for its noradrenergic effect in the postganglionic sympathetic axons and the depletion of norepinephrine reserves, and phentolamine for its effect of a adrenergic antagonism, are used in different ways like intravenous infusions or regional blocks to determine whether the pain is related to the sympathetic system helps to define its therapy (14).
8) An RCT of IV guanethidine found no benefit compared with saline.
Effect of guanethidine on dopamine in small intensily fluorescent cells of the superior ganglion of the rat.
Other common drugs that can provoke similar symptoms are aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, beta blockers (oral and ophthalmic), bromocriptine, estrogens, oral contraceptives, prazosin, methyladopa, phentolamine, guanethidine, reserpine, and tricyclic antidepressants.
According to Woosley and Nies (1976), agents that affect sympathetic nerve terminals, such as guanethidine, commonly produce failure of ejaculation or retrograde ejaculation in as many as 60% of men.