guava


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gua·va

 (gwä′və)
n.
1. Any of various tropical American shrubs and trees of the genus Psidium, especially P. guajava, widely cultivated for its edible fruit, having greenish skin and sweet white or pink flesh.
2. The fruit of this plant.

[Spanish guayaba, perhaps of Arawakan origin.]

guava

(ˈɡwɑːvə)
n
1. (Plants) any of various tropical American trees of the myrtaceous genus Psidium, esp P. guajava, grown in tropical regions for their edible fruit
2. (Plants) the fruit of such a tree, having yellow skin and pink pulp: used to make jellies, jams, etc
[C16: from Spanish guayaba, from a South American Indian word]

gua•va

(ˈgwɑ və)

n., pl. -vas.
1. any tropical American tree or shrub of the genus Psidium, of the myrtle family, esp. P. guajava.
2. the large yellow fruit of this tree.
[1545–55; < Sp guayaba < Arawak]

guava


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A tropical edible fruit, which turns from green to yellow when ripe. The fruit is best stewed or made into jam or jelly.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.guava - small tropical shrubby tree bearing small yellowish fruitguava - small tropical shrubby tree bearing small yellowish fruit
fruit tree - tree bearing edible fruit
2.guava - small tropical American shrubby treeguava - small tropical American shrubby tree; widely cultivated in warm regions for its sweet globular yellow fruit
guava - tropical fruit having yellow skin and pink pulp; eaten fresh or used for e.g. jellies
fruit tree - tree bearing edible fruit
3.guava - tropical fruit having yellow skin and pink pulp; eaten fresh or used for e.g. jellies
edible fruit - edible reproductive body of a seed plant especially one having sweet flesh
guava bush, Psidium guajava, true guava, guava - small tropical American shrubby tree; widely cultivated in warm regions for its sweet globular yellow fruit
Translations
ثَمَر الجوافَه
guava
guava
guava
gúavaber
guava
guava

guava

[ˈgwɑːvə] Nguayaba f

guava

[ˈgwɑːvə] ngoyave f

guava

nGuave f; (= tree also)Guavenbaum m

guava

(ˈgwaːvə) noun
the yellow pear-shaped fruit of a type of tropical tree.
References in classic literature ?
It was a ring of land round a deep lagoon, uninhabited, and covered only with scrub and wild guava. With the intrepid woman who was his wife, and a few natives, he landed there, and set about building a house, and clearing the scrub so that he could plant cocoa-nuts.
Even the brush-wood is an imported fruit-tree, namely, the guava, which from its abundance has become as noxious as a weed.
He kept Macmurdo in cigars and sent over quantities of shells, cayenne pepper, hot pickles, guava jelly, and colonial produce to Lady Jane.
Miss Mills had sailed, and Dora and I had gone aboard a great East Indiaman at Gravesend to see her; and we had had preserved ginger, and guava, and other delicacies of that sort for lunch; and we had left Miss Mills weeping on a camp-stool on the quarter-deck, with a large new diary under her arm, in which the original reflections awakened by the contemplation of Ocean were to be recorded under lock and key.
For three days I lived off guavas, OHIA-apples, and bananas, all of which grew wild in the jungle.
'A guava tree takes five to six years to bear fruit and commercialisation of the land in Kohat has dented the interest of the growers to plant guava,' he said.
WiseGuyReports have announced the addition of a new report titled "2019 Global and Regional Guava Puree Market Research Report Forecast 2025".
He ordered sourdough bread with kesong puti and a kind of guava sweet, not guava jelly.
The ambassador in a boat visited different sections of the guava market and talked to the farmers and traders and exchanged pleasantries.
Guava leaves are rich in analgesic, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties.
GUAVA FRUIT SQUARES In a large bowl, beat 4 egg yolks with sugar; stir in 1 tablespoon yoghurt (or sour cream may be used).
Guava is a climacteric fruit, and its harvest is concentrated in the period from January to April, showing a decline throughout the year, and guava pulp is a byproduct used by the industry during guava off-season (SEBRAE, 2016).