guild


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guild

also gild  (gĭld)
n.
1.
a. An association of persons of the same trade or pursuits, formed to protect mutual interests and maintain standards.
b. A similar association, as of merchants or artisans, in medieval times.
2. Ecology A group of species in a community that use similar environmental resources in a similar way, such as a group of songbirds that all glean insects from leaves.

[Middle English gild, from Old Norse gildi, payment, guild.]

guild

(ɡɪld) or

gild

n
1. an organization, club, or fellowship
2. (Historical Terms) (esp in medieval Europe) an association of men sharing the same interests, such as merchants or artisans: formed for mutual aid and protection and to maintain craft standards or pursue some other purpose such as communal worship
3. (Botany) ecology a group of plants, such as a group of epiphytes, that share certain habits or characteristics
[C14: of Scandinavian origin; compare Old Norse gjald payment, gildi guild; related to Old English gield offering, Old High German gelt money]

guild

or gild

(gɪld)

n.
1. an organization of persons with related interests, goals, etc., esp. one formed for mutual aid or protection.
2. any of various medieval associations, as of merchants or artisans, organized for such purposes.
3. a group of plants, as parasites, having a similar habit of growth and nutrition.
[before 1000; Middle English gild(e), probably < Old Norse gildi guild, payment; akin to geld2]

Guild

 an association of men or women belonging to the same class or engaged in the same industry, profession, interested in the same leisure, literary, or other pursuit, etc. See also association, fraternity. Used also in such forms as Townwomen’s Guild, Guild of Woodworkers, etc.
Examples: guild of the learned, 1817; of Sibyls, 1871.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.guild - a formal association of people with similar interestsguild - a formal association of people with similar interests; "he joined a golf club"; "they formed a small lunch society"; "men from the fraternal order will staff the soup kitchen today"
association - a formal organization of people or groups of people; "he joined the Modern Language Association"
athenaeum, atheneum - a literary or scientific association for the promotion of learning
bookclub - a club that people join in order to buy selected books at reduced prices
chapter - a local branch of some fraternity or association; "he joined the Atlanta chapter"
chess club - a club of people to play chess
country club - a suburban club for recreation and socializing
frat, fraternity - a social club for male undergraduates
glee club - a club organized to sing together
golf club - a club of people to play golf
hunt club, hunt - an association of huntsmen who hunt for sport
investors club - a club of small investors who buy and sell securities jointly
jockey club - a club to promote and regulate horse racing
racket club - club for players of racket sports
rowing club - a club for rowers
slate club - a group of people who save money in a common fund for a specific purpose (usually distributed at Christmas)
sorority - a social club for female undergraduates
turnverein - a club of tumblers or gymnasts
boat club, yacht club - club that promotes and supports yachting and boating
service club - a club of professional or business people organized for their coordination and active in public services
club member - someone who is a member of a club

guild

guild

noun
A group of people united in a relationship and having some interest, activity, or purpose in common:
Translations
cech
lav
kilta
cechgildia
ceh

guild

[gɪld] Ngremio m

guild

[ˈgɪld] n
(HISTORY)corporation f
[writers, artists, craftsmen] → cercle m, association f

guild

n (Hist) → Zunft f, → Gilde f; (= association)Verein m

guild

[gɪld] n (History) → corporazione f, arte f, gilda; (club) → associazione f
References in classic literature ?
Each trade, however, had its own guild by which the members of it were bound together.
Generally each play was presented by a single guild (though sometimes two or three guilds or two or three plays might be combined), and sometimes, though not always, there was a special fitness in the assignment, as when the watermen gave the play of Noah's Ark or the bakers that of the Last Supper.
The guild-masters were pushed on one side by the manufacturing middle class; division of labour between the different corporate guilds vanished in the face of division of labour in each single workshop.
For this day the Sheriff hath asked all the Butcher Guild to feast with him at the Guild Hall.
By the way, I hope that you will come to some of our Guild meetings.
Then the butchers saw that they must meet craft with craft; and they said to him, "Come, brother butcher, if you would sell meat with us, you must e'en join our guild and stand by the rules of our trade.
There were nine guilds with five hundred men in each, and there were nine bulls to each guild.
The office of that great personage, the Guide-in-Chief of the Chamonix Guild of Guides, was near by.
There was a fete in the parish and the innkeeper, Vasili Andreevich Brekhunov, a Second Guild merchant, being a church elder had to go to church, and had also to entertain his relatives and friends at home.
Barclay was, it appears, a member of the Roman Catholic Church, and had interested herself very much in the establishment of the Guild of St.
Such another, Gurth, will redeem thy bondage, and make thee a brother as free of thy guild as the best.
After the destruction of San Francisco, Governor Guild, of Massachusetts, sent an appeal for the stricken city to the three hundred and fifty-four mayors of his State; and by the courtesy of the Bell Company, which carried the messages free, they were delivered to the last and furthermost mayors in less than five hours.