guildry

guildry

(ˈɡɪldrɪ)
n
(Commerce) Scot the corporation of merchants in a burgh
References in periodicals archive ?
Speech Dean of the Guildry of Stirling Alasdair Gammack presents Julie Christie from Start Up Stirling with a Guildry Goblet as a thank you for her talk on the charity
Girls Guildry members prepare for the Queen's visit to the Music Hall in 1977 are, from left, seniors Brigadier Elaine Forsyth (1st Causewayend) representing 1907; Brigadier Dorothy Davidson (19th Denburn); Captain Doreen Nicoll (20th John Knox, Mounthooly) and Captain Roseann Thomson (32nd St Clements) representing 1900.
Written primarily in Latin, they contain the proceedings of the Bailie, the Guildry and the Head Courts and shed light on a huge array of topics such as elections and trade through to public health and the transfer of property.
Mrs MacDonald joined Govan 4 Girls' Guildry, now known as 34th Glasgow Girls' Brigade, at the age of three.
She came through the ranks of 4th Coatbridge Girls' Guildry as a youngster; now the Girls' Brigade, she returned to the company in 1973 to be its captain for 10 years.
When the company started, the Methodist Church was in the High Street but in the mid 1960s, the Girls' Life Brigade merged with the Girls' Guildry and Girls' Brigade of Ireland to form The Girls' Brigade.
Brigade (Ireland), which had been founded in 1893, and the Girls' Guildry, which had started in Scotland in 1900.
The game then went to penalties with a trophy donated by Ayr Guildry to celebrate the 800th anniversary of the Royal Borough of Ayr.
LOOKING for former members of the 37th Girls Guildry / 71st Girls Brigade.
GUILDRY OF STIRLING The Guildry of Stirling held its Summer Court in the Golden Lion Hotel last Wednesday.
In 1965 it joined with the Girls' Brigade of Ireland and the Girls' Guildry of Scotland and the three organisations became known as the Girls' Brigade.