guimpe

(redirected from guimps)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

guimpe

 (gămp, gĭmp)
n.
1. A blouse worn under a jumper.
2. A yoke insert for a low-necked dress.
3. A starched cloth covering the neck and shoulders as part of a nun's habit.
4. See gimp1.

[French, from Old French guimple, from Old High German wimpal; see weip- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

guimpe

(ɡɪmp; ɡæmp)
n
1. (Clothing & Fashion) a short blouse with sleeves worn under a pinafore dress
2. (Clothing & Fashion) a fill-in for a low-cut dress
3. (Clothing & Fashion) a piece of starched cloth covering the chest and shoulders of a nun's habit
4. (Textiles) a variant spelling of gimp1
[C19: variant of gimp]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

guimpe

(gɪmp, gæmp)

n.
1. a chemisette or yoke of lace, net, or the like for filling in the neckline of a low-cut dress.
2. a short blouse, usu. with sleeves, worn under a jumper or pinafore.
3. a wide, stiffly starched cloth covering the neck and shoulders, worn as part of the habit by certain orders of nuns.
[1840–50; see gimp1]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.guimpe - a piece of starched cloth covering the shoulders of a nun's habit
nun's habit - a long loose habit worn by nuns in a convent
piece of cloth, piece of material - a separate part consisting of fabric
2.guimpe - a short blouse with sleeves that is worn under a jumper or pinafore dress
blouse - a top worn by women
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Historical accounts of Swiss educational reformer Johann Heinrich Pestalozzi (1746-1827) have focused primarily on his achievements and the achievements of his male disciples in and outside Switzerland (Morf 1887; Guimps 1890; Pinloche 1901; Jedan 1981).
Later, Roger de Guimps would call Pestalozzi's first attempt to educate those in need "the heroic struggle," which lasted for two years and ceased in 1780 after "resources and credit being alike exhausted, an enterprise, to which the husband and the wife had devoted the last strength and shilling, had to be finally abandoned" (Guimps 1890, 68).
Elizabeth Naef was a common woman to whom Pestalozzi referred in German as Magd or "maid," meaning "a young woman from a common family." Elizabeth, barely twenty years of age, came to the rescue of the entrepreneurs just when they needed her the most (Guimps 1890; Pestalozzi, Silber, and Hager 1993).