gun moll

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gun moll

n. Slang
See moll.

[Obsolete British slang gun, thief (short for slang ganef; see ganef) + moll.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

gun moll

n
slang a female criminal or a woman who associates with criminals
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

gun′ moll`


n.
Slang.
a female companion of a criminal.
[1905–10; gun, British argot “thief,” shortening of gonnof (see ganef)]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gun moll - the girlfriend of a gangstergun moll - the girlfriend of a gangster  
criminal, crook, felon, malefactor, outlaw - someone who has committed a crime or has been legally convicted of a crime
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
One chapter not to be missed by anyone working with female offenders is Esther Heffernan's "Gendered Perceptions of Dangerous and Dependent Women: 'Gun Molls' and 'Fallen Women.'" This historical perspective explores the way the beliefs about women have shaped the prison system.
Along the way, he meets many characters of the '50s, such as gangsters and gun molls, and becomes involved in exploits that will become fodder for his notebook.
CLAIRE BOND POTTER has written on gun molls in the 1930s, and is the author of War on Crime: Bandits, G-Men and the Politics of Mass Culture (Rutgers University Press, 1998).
Tommy guns, gangsters in tacky clothes (that hasn't changed much), gun molls and J.
Unlike John Dillinger's sweetheart, Evelyn "Billie" Frechette, who was awaiting trial on conspiracy charges in the same jail, these gun molls were interrogated extensively and then released.(2)
Throughout several days of interrogations Crompton, Conforti, and Gillis steadfastly insisted that they were not gun molls; ironically, this contributed to the popular belief that they were.
Silence, and breaking silence, are both themes and methodological problems when studying the gun molls of the 1930s.
Edgar Hoover and the federal Division of Investigation carried out a nationwide campaign against bandit crime, gun molls were arrested, interrogated, and often publicly tried as accomplices to federal crimes.
Close readings of rhetoric, language, and particular tropes (specifically those surrounding family, heterosexual partnership, and female identity) both link gun molls to larger themes in the history of women and expand our understanding of how gender ideologies shape female experience.(8) For example, female bandits created households and relationships with their bandit lovers which drew on the language and structures of conventional marriage.
In addition, federal laws passed in 1934 made aiding and abetting fugitives a crime in itself so that cultural value systems which required women to "stand by their men" were inverted in the case of the criminal woman, transforming gun molls from "loyal wives" to enemies of the state.
Because "normal" standards of behavior and social ideals were invoked with such frequency by gun molls, I will sort these ideas into two categories: hetorosexual love, the reinvention of marriage, and the meaning of family; and power, sexuality, and the codes of honor which ruled a female bandit's moral world.
In short, previous to becoming gun molls, some of these women had made ambitious and independent choices.