gunning


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

gun

 (gŭn)
n.
1. A weapon consisting of a metal tube from which a projectile is fired at high velocity into a relatively flat trajectory, especially:
a. A portable firearm, such as a rifle or revolver.
b. A cannon with a long barrel and a relatively low angle of fire.
2. A device resembling a firearm or cannon, as in its ability to project something, such as grease or paint, under pressure or at great speed.
3. A discharge of a firearm or cannon as a signal or salute: heard the guns honoring the leader.
4. One who is armed with or skilled in the use of a gun.
5. The throttle of an engine, as of an automobile.
6. guns Slang The biceps muscles of the arms.
v. gunned, gun·ning, guns
v.tr.
1. To shoot (a person): a bank robber who was gunned down by the police.
2. To open the throttle of (an engine) so as to accelerate: gunned the engine and sped off.
v.intr.
To hunt with a gun.
Phrasal Verb:
gun for
1. To plan or take action to harm or destroy (someone).
2. To go after in earnest; set out to obtain: gunning for a promotion.
Idioms:
go great guns
To proceed or perform with great speed, skill, or success.
hold a gun to (someone's) head
To put pressure on someone.
under the gun
Under great pressure or under threat.

[Middle English gonne, cannon, short for Gunilda, woman's name applied to a siege engine, from Old Norse Gunnhildr, woman's name : gunnr, war; see gwhen- in Indo-European roots + hildr, war.]

gunning

(ˈɡʌnɪŋ)
n
1. (Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) the act or an instance of shooting with guns
2. (Hunting) the art, practice, or act of hunting game with guns
References in periodicals archive ?
According to student accounts, Steinhaeuser entered a classroom where he killed two girls (ages 14 and 15), then went from room to room gunning down teachers and other school personnel.
In this literary study of racial violence, Sandra Gunning explores the work of both black and white writers as public discourse influencing the construction of racial, gendered, and national identities.
Gunning's method of analysis draws from the previous scholarship of Trudier Harris, Hazel Carby, Elsa Barkley Brown, and Claudia Tate as she integrates the categories of race, class, and gender to reveal complex and at times contradictory readings that locate the selected texts in a dialectical relationship to each other.