gust


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gust 1

 (gŭst)
n.
1. A strong, abrupt rush of wind.
2. A sudden burst, as of rain or smoke.
3. An outburst of emotion.
intr.v. gust·ed, gust·ing, gusts
To blow in gusts.

[Probably from Old Norse gustr; see gheu- in Indo-European roots.]

gust 2

 (gŭst)
n.
1. Archaic Relish; gusto.
2. Obsolete
a. The sense of taste.
b. Personal taste or inclination; liking.

[Middle English guste, taste, from Latin gustus; see gusto.]

gust

(ɡʌst)
n
1. (Physical Geography) a sudden blast of wind
2. a sudden rush of smoke, sound, etc
3. an outburst of emotion
vb (intr)
(Physical Geography) to blow in gusts: the wind was gusting to more than 50 mph.
[C16: from Old Norse gustr; related to gjōsa to gush; see geyser]

gust1

(gʌst)

n., v. gust•ed, gust•ing. n.
1. a sudden strong blast of wind.
2. a sudden rush or burst, as of water or fire.
3. an outburst of passionate feeling.
v.i.
4. to blow or rush in gusts.
[1580–90; < Old Norse gustr a gust, akin to gjōsa, gusa to gust]
syn: See wind1.

gust2

(gʌst)

n.
1. Archaic. flavor or taste.
2. Obs. enjoyment or gratification.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin gustus a tasting (of food), eating a little, akin to gustāre to taste]
gust′a•ble, adj., n.

Gust

 sudden outburst. See also rack.
Examples: gust of fire, 1674; of grace, 1807; of grief, 1715; of hope, 1705; of joy, 1789; of passion, 1783; of pleasure, 1704; of sin, 1639; of smoke, 1811; of sound, 1849; of tears, 1870; of unholy passion, 1852; of temptation, 1681; of water, 1610; of weather, 1697; of wind, 1694.

gust


Past participle: gusted
Gerund: gusting

Imperative
gust
gust
Present
I gust
you gust
he/she/it gusts
we gust
you gust
they gust
Preterite
I gusted
you gusted
he/she/it gusted
we gusted
you gusted
they gusted
Present Continuous
I am gusting
you are gusting
he/she/it is gusting
we are gusting
you are gusting
they are gusting
Present Perfect
I have gusted
you have gusted
he/she/it has gusted
we have gusted
you have gusted
they have gusted
Past Continuous
I was gusting
you were gusting
he/she/it was gusting
we were gusting
you were gusting
they were gusting
Past Perfect
I had gusted
you had gusted
he/she/it had gusted
we had gusted
you had gusted
they had gusted
Future
I will gust
you will gust
he/she/it will gust
we will gust
you will gust
they will gust
Future Perfect
I will have gusted
you will have gusted
he/she/it will have gusted
we will have gusted
you will have gusted
they will have gusted
Future Continuous
I will be gusting
you will be gusting
he/she/it will be gusting
we will be gusting
you will be gusting
they will be gusting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been gusting
you have been gusting
he/she/it has been gusting
we have been gusting
you have been gusting
they have been gusting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been gusting
you will have been gusting
he/she/it will have been gusting
we will have been gusting
you will have been gusting
they will have been gusting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been gusting
you had been gusting
he/she/it had been gusting
we had been gusting
you had been gusting
they had been gusting
Conditional
I would gust
you would gust
he/she/it would gust
we would gust
you would gust
they would gust
Past Conditional
I would have gusted
you would have gusted
he/she/it would have gusted
we would have gusted
you would have gusted
they would have gusted
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gust - a strong current of airgust - a strong current of air; "the tree was bent almost double by the gust"
bluster - a violent gusty wind
sandblast - a blast of wind laden with sand
puff, puff of air, whiff - a short light gust of air
air current, current of air, wind - air moving (sometimes with considerable force) from an area of high pressure to an area of low pressure; "trees bent under the fierce winds"; "when there is no wind, row"; "the radioactivity was being swept upwards by the air current and out into the atmosphere"

gust

noun
1. blast, blow, rush, breeze, puff, gale, flurry, squall A gust of wind drove down the valley.
2. surge, fit, storm, burst, explosion, gale, outburst, eruption, paroxysm A gust of laughter greeted him as he walked into the room.
verb
1. blow, blast, puff, squall strong winds gusting up to 164 miles an hour

gust

noun
1. A natural movement or current of air:
Archaic: gale.
2. A sudden violent expression, as of emotion:
Translations
عَصْفَه، هَبَّه، نَفْحَههَبَّة
poryvprudký závan
vindstød
puuskaryöppy
nalet
gustur, vindhviîa
突風
돌풍
audringaigūsingassu gūsiaisšuorasvėjuotumas
brāzma
náraz
sunek
vindil
ลมแรงพัดกะทันหัน
ani rüzgaranî ve şiddetli esiş
cơn gió mạnh đột ngột

gust

[gʌst]
A. N [of wind] → ráfaga f, racha f
B. VIsoplar racheado
the wind gusted up to 120km/hel viento soplaba en rachas de hasta 120km/h

gust

[ˈgʌst]
n
[wind] → rafale f
[smoke] → bouffée f
vi [wind] → souffler en rafales

gust

n (of wind)Stoß m, → Bö(e) f; (of rain)Böe f; (fig, of emotion) → Anfall m; a gust of cold/hot airein Schwall mkalte/heiße Luft; a gust of laughtereine Lachsalve; gusts of up to 100 km/hBöen von bis zu 100 km/h; the wind was blowing in gustsder Wind wehte böig or stürmisch

gust

[gʌst] n (of wind) → folata; (stronger) → raffica; (of rain) → scroscio; (of smoke) → sbuffo; (of laughter) → scoppio

gust

(gast) noun
a sudden blast (of wind). gusts of wind of up to eighty kilometres an hour.
ˈgusty adjective
a gusty day.
ˈgustily adverb
ˈgustiness noun

gust

هَبَّة poryv vindstød Windstoß ριπή ανέμου ráfaga puuska bourrasque nalet folata 突風 돌풍 windvlaag vindkast poryw rajada de vento порыв vindil ลมแรงพัดกะทันหัน ani rüzgar cơn gió mạnh đột ngột 阵风
References in classic literature ?
There was a simultaneous sigh, which created quite a little gust, as the last hope fled, and the treat was ravished from their longing lips.
Each gust, as it bore down, rattled the panes, and swelled off like the others.
The alarmed colonists believed that the yells of the savages mingled with every fitful gust of wind that issued from the interminable forests of the west.
He tried the door, which yielded to his hand, and was flung wide open by a sudden gust of wind that passed, as with a loud sigh, from the outermost portal through all the passages and apartments of the new house.
The answer to my appeal was instantaneous, but it came in the form of an extraordinary blast and chill, a gust of frozen air, and a shake of the room as great as if, in the wild wind, the casement had crashed in.
A wild gust of wind swept down, extinguishing the candle he held in his hand, and with it the fearful, unearthly screams; they seemed to be shrieked in his very ear.
It would get so dark that it looked all blue-black outside, and lovely; and the rain would thrash along by so thick that the trees off a little ways looked dim and spider- webby; and here would come a blast of wind that would bend the trees down and turn up the pale under- side of the leaves; and then a perfect ripper of a gust would follow along and set the branches to tossing their arms as if they was just wild; and next, when it was just about the bluest and blackest -- FST
If a gust of wind swept the waste, I looked up, fearing it was the rush of a bull; if a plover whistled, I imagined it a man.
Mary had stepped close to the robin, and suddenly the gust of wind swung aside some loose ivy trails, and more suddenly still she jumped toward it and caught it in her hand.
Every time he uttered this ejaculation, his eyes seemed to be in danger of starting out; and every sentence he spoke, he delivered in a sort of tune, always exactly the same, and more like a gust of wind, which begins low, mounts up high, and falls again, than any other comparison I can find for it.
These changes in the Heav'ns, though slow, produc'd Like change on Sea and Land, sideral blast, Vapour, and Mist, and Exhalation hot, Corrupt and Pestilent: Now from the North Of NORUMBEGA, and the SAMOED shoar Bursting thir brazen Dungeon, armd with ice And snow and haile and stormie gust and flaw, BOREAS and CAECIAS and ARGESTES loud And THRASCIAS rend the Woods and Seas upturn; With adverse blast up-turns them from the South NOTUS and AFER black with thundrous Clouds From SERRALIONA; thwart of these as fierce Forth rush the LEVANT and the PONENT VVindes EURUS and ZEPHIR with thir lateral noise, SIROCCO, and LIBECCHIO.
The naked Saxon serf was drowning the sense of his half-year's hunger and thirst, in one day of gluttony and drunkenness the more pampered burgess and guild-brother was eating his morsel with gust, or curiously criticising the quantity of the malt and the skill of the brewer.