gwine

gwine

 (gwīn)
v. Chiefly Southern & South Midland US
A present participle of go1.

[African American Vernacular English, alteration of going.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
"I done heah, Massa Tom, dat yo' all's gwine off on a long trip once mo'.
"I I ain't gwine? Does yo' mean dat yo' all ain't gwine to take me, Massa Tom?"
"Oh, I's middlin'; hain't got noth'n' to complain of, I's gwine to come a-court'n you bimeby, Roxy."
'Clah to goodness if dat conceit o' yo'n strikes in, Jasper, it gwine to kill you sho'.
We can't read de newspapers very much, but we knows how to vote, an' we wants you to vote jes' like we votes." He added: "We watches de white man, and we keeps watching de white man till we finds out which way de white man's gwine to vote; an' when we finds out which way de white man's gwine to vote, den we votes 'xactly de other way.
She say she spec' Mars Tom gwine to ax me to whitewash, an' so she tole me go 'long an' 'tend to my own business -- she 'lowed SHE'D 'tend to de whitewashin'."
I'm a-comin', I'm a-comin', an' I'm shorely gwine to get yer!
Now, I went over thar when Miss Mary was gwine to be married, and Jinny she jest showed me de weddin' pies.
Hard ears yuh won't hear by and by yuh gwine feel," he said.
As Julius understands, there may be enough room on the new Southern plantation for an old-time Negro of the sort that, in Chesnutt's words, prefers "kicks to half-pence," but it is uncertain whether another sort of African American, a freedman with full citizenship, will retain equal access to the fruits of Southern culture.(5) Thus after fielding the first of many questions John will eventually ask about local history, Julius interrupts with a question of his own, one that makes it unmistakably clear who has really approached whom at an angle from the rear: "Is you de Norv'n gemman w'at's gwine ter buy de ole vimya'd?" (34).
The slaves belittle Adolph by reminding him of his true status when they tell him "they's gwine to trade ye off with a lot o'cracked tea-pots" (337).
I'm gwine to get him a job in the workhouse, so he'll have something to do.