gynandromorph


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gy·nan·dro·morph

 (gī-năn′drə-môrf′, jĭ-)
n.
An organism having both male and female characteristics, especially an insect exhibiting a mixture of male and female tissues or sex organs.

gy·nan′dro·mor′phic adj.
gy·nan′dro·mor′phism, gy·nan′dro·mor′phy n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

gynandromorph

(dʒɪˈnændrəʊˌmɔːf; ɡaɪ-; dʒaɪ-)
n
(Biology) an organism, esp an insect, that has both male and female physical characteristics. Compare hermaphrodite1
gyˌnandroˈmorphic, gyˌnandroˈmorphous adj
gyˌnandroˈmorphism, gyˈnandroˌmorphy n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

gy•nan•dro•morph

(gaɪˈnæn drəˌmɔrf, dʒɪ-)

n.
an individual having morphological characteristics of both sexes.
[1895–1900; < Greek gýnandro(s) (see gynandrous)]
gy•nan`dro•mor′phic, gy•nan`dro•mor′phous, adj.
gy•nan`dro•morph′ism, gy•nan′dro•mor`phy, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gynandromorph - one having both male and female sexual characteristics and organsgynandromorph - one having both male and female sexual characteristics and organs; at birth an unambiguous assignment of male or female cannot be made
bisexual, bisexual person - a person who is sexually attracted to both sexes
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
2014 and a conspecific gynandromorph (Ensifera: Tettigoniidae: Phaneropterinae).
According to previous definitions of the types of gynandromorphism in ticks (Campana-Rouget 1959), the gynandromorph of A.
The only information in the literature about this species refers to systematic aspects, occurrence and characterisation of the adults (Lemaire, 2002), as well as the record of a gynandromorph (Moraes, 2005).
The Scottish scientists studied three of half-boy, half-girl chickens, which are called gynandromorphs. "Gyn" means female and "andro" means male, so a "gynandromorph" has some male parts and some female parts.