gypsophila

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gyp·soph·i·la

 (jĭp-sŏf′ə-lə)
n.
Any of various plants of the genus Gypsophila in the pink family, having small white or pink flowers and including baby's breath.

[New Latin Gypsophila, genus name : Greek gupsos, chalk; see gypsum + Greek philos, loving; see -phile.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

gypsophila

(dʒɪpˈsɒfɪlə)
n
(Plants) any caryophyllaceous plant of the mainly Eurasian genus Gypsophila, such as baby's-breath, having small white or pink flowers
[C18: New Latin, from Greek gupsos chalk + philos loving]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gypsophila - Mediterranean herbs having small white or pink flowersGypsophila - Mediterranean herbs having small white or pink flowers
caryophylloid dicot genus - genus of relatively early dicotyledonous plants including mostly flowers
carnation family, Caryophyllaceae, family Caryophyllaceae, pink family - large family of herbs or subshrubs (usually with stems swollen at the nodes)
babies'-breath, baby's breath, Gypsophila paniculata - tall plant with small lance-shaped leaves and numerous tiny white or pink flowers
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Event stylist Robert Blancaflor was in charge of decorating the place for the celebration, with white balloons and fresh Ecuadorian Gypsophilas flowers.
Gypsophilas are often grown as ornamental plants in gardens, they are grown both as garden plants and also valuable as a cut flower in floristry to add as a filler to flower bouquets (Rehman, 2002).
_: ABSTRACT: Apical meristem as explant was used to micropropagate the economically important cut flower plant, Gypsophila paniculata L.
Key words: Gypsophila paniculata L.; Murashige and Skoog's; Shoot initiation; Root initiation.
The major issue is phytoplasma disease, which has been identified in Gypsophila (Gera et al., 2005).