gyre


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gyre

 (jīr)
n.
A circular or spiral motion or form, especially a circular ocean current.
intr.v. gyred, gyr·ing, gyres
To whirl.

[Latin gȳrus, from Greek gūros.]

gyre

(dʒaɪə)
n
1. a circular or spiral movement or path
2. a ring, circle, or spiral
vb
(intr) to whirl
[C16: from Latin gӯrus circle, from Greek guros]

gyre

(dʒaɪər)

n.
1. a ring or circle.
2. a circular course or motion.
3. a ringlike system of ocean currents rotating clockwise in the Northern Hemisphere and counterclockwise in the Southern Hemisphere.
[1560–70; < Latin gȳrus < Greek gŷros ring, circle]

gyre

- A circular movement or revolution; to cause to spin around or whirl.
See also related terms for revolution.

gyre


Past participle: gyred
Gerund: gyring

Imperative
gyre
gyre
Present
I gyre
you gyre
he/she/it gyres
we gyre
you gyre
they gyre
Preterite
I gyred
you gyred
he/she/it gyred
we gyred
you gyred
they gyred
Present Continuous
I am gyring
you are gyring
he/she/it is gyring
we are gyring
you are gyring
they are gyring
Present Perfect
I have gyred
you have gyred
he/she/it has gyred
we have gyred
you have gyred
they have gyred
Past Continuous
I was gyring
you were gyring
he/she/it was gyring
we were gyring
you were gyring
they were gyring
Past Perfect
I had gyred
you had gyred
he/she/it had gyred
we had gyred
you had gyred
they had gyred
Future
I will gyre
you will gyre
he/she/it will gyre
we will gyre
you will gyre
they will gyre
Future Perfect
I will have gyred
you will have gyred
he/she/it will have gyred
we will have gyred
you will have gyred
they will have gyred
Future Continuous
I will be gyring
you will be gyring
he/she/it will be gyring
we will be gyring
you will be gyring
they will be gyring
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been gyring
you have been gyring
he/she/it has been gyring
we have been gyring
you have been gyring
they have been gyring
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been gyring
you will have been gyring
he/she/it will have been gyring
we will have been gyring
you will have been gyring
they will have been gyring
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been gyring
you had been gyring
he/she/it had been gyring
we had been gyring
you had been gyring
they had been gyring
Conditional
I would gyre
you would gyre
he/she/it would gyre
we would gyre
you would gyre
they would gyre
Past Conditional
I would have gyred
you would have gyred
he/she/it would have gyred
we would have gyred
you would have gyred
they would have gyred
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gyre - a round shape formed by a series of concentric circles (as formed by leaves or flower petals)gyre - a round shape formed by a series of concentric circles (as formed by leaves or flower petals)
corolla - (botany) the whorl of petals of a flower that collectively form an inner floral envelope or layer of the perianth; "we cultivate the flower for its corolla"
calyx - (botany) the whorl of sepals of a flower collectively forming the outer floral envelope or layer of the perianth enclosing and supporting the developing bud; usually green
round shape - a shape that is curved and without sharp angles
verticil - a whorl of leaves growing around a stem

gyre

noun
A closed plane curve everywhere equidistant from a fixed point or something shaped like this:
Archaic: orb.
Translations
pyörre
References in classic literature ?
JABBERWOCKY 'Twas brillig, and the slithy toves Did gyre and gimble in the wabe; All mimsy were the borogoves, And the mome raths outgrabe.
These hatchlings then drift and possibly swim against sea currents - this is a major debate - and forage on invertebrates in the water column, following the Atlantic Gyre.
Co-directors Toby Olie and Finn Caldwell, who founded company Gyre & Gimble, began working on the production in 2014 and were on the look out for a new show that incorporated puppetry.
Other pieces of debris end up in unexpected places after meandering from gyre to gyre.
By viewing multiple locations (the gyre, Midway Island, plastic factories, fish market) players can understand the origin of this plastic garbage, the impact it has on the world around us and the steps they can take to help solve the problem.
The North Pacific Gyre has become colloquially known as the 'Great Pacific Garbage Patch,' although the name is somewhat misleading as the vast majority of the 'garbage' consists of microscopic particulate matter, rather than a floating waste disposal site.
It also happens to be near the centre of the South Pacific Gyre, a circular ocean current that gathers together man-made debris carried from South America and deposited by fishing boats.
It works like this: During some multiyear periods, the Arctic is cold and dry and dominated by high atmospheric pressure that sets in motion strong anticyclonic (clockwise) winds over the Beaufort Gyre region.
The most popular being The Great Pacific Garbage Patch, located in the North Pacific Gyre off the coast of California.
Debris collects within the gyre in areas called garbage patches.
The most striking characteristic of the ocean near Easter Island is its clarity, representing the poorest plankton productivity on Earth, in the eastern-central part of the South Pacific Sub-tropical Gyre (SPSG) (Morel et al.
Charles Moore, who is credited with discovering the gyre on a yachting race in the North Pacific, led a team of scientists on a two-month expedition to the heart of the Garbage Patch beginning in July, and what they saw shocked them.