gyrostatic

gy·ro·stat

 (jī′rə-stăt′)
n.
A gyroscope consisting of a rotating wheel in a rigid case.

gy′ro·stat′ic adj.
gy′ro·stat′i·cal·ly adv.

gyrostatic

(ˌdʒaɪrəʊˈstætɪk)
adj
(General Physics) of or concerned with the gyroscope or with gyrostatics
ˌgyroˈstatically adv
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References in periodicals archive ?
Finally, however, the alacrity with which Kelvin finally solves various elasticity troubles of an aether simultaneously capable of transmitting light as well as supporting his ring vortex model is shown not only in his article "On a Gyrostatic Adynamic Constitution for Ether" but throughout his volume three of "Mathematical and Physical Papers" It is this re-injection of a workable solution from MacCullagh which will continue to prove the value of a hydrodynamical view of electromagnetism into the modern age.
Larmor, directly using Lord Kelvin's gyrostatic explication of MacCullagh's aether was able to publish what is now regarded as the "Lorentz transformations" two years before Lorentz, albeit less generally expressed.
Thomson, William (1890) "On a Gyrostatic Adynamic Constitution for Ether" Proceedings of Royal Society Edinburgh Mar 17th 1890.
The problem was addressed [8,9] by developing the so-called gyrostatic LOMs, or G-models (see Section 2, in particular, the simplest such model in a forced regime proved equivalent to the Lorenz model (1)), and via extended Nambu or Lie-Poisson formalisms [10-17].
Note that, unlike linear friction terms, linear terms in (3) (linear gyrostatic terms) do not affect the conservation of energy nor the conservation of phase space volume.
G-models are all of the above gyrostatic LOMs: Volterra gyrostats, coupled Volterra gyrostats, and n-dimensional gyrostats.
In comparison to the general form (3), the gyrostat in (7) has only two nonlinear terms, but it has all three pairs of linear gyrostatic terms unlike the Lorenz gyrostat in (4) that has only one such pair.
--, and --, 2008: Gyrostatic extensions of the Howard-Krishnamurti model of thermal convection with shear.
Once you had accepted the principle of the gyrostatic car, there was a lot to be said in its favour.
But news of the gyrostatic car had obviously spread, for in 1917 a party of Russian officers arrived at the Wolseley works with the intention of taking Schilowsky's vehicle into production.
But this is not quite the end of Count Schilowsky's gyrostatic car.
Count Schilowsky's gyrostatic Russian car, built by Wolseley Tool and Motor Car Company in Adderley Park, Birmingham; The two-wheel car shown without its bodywork