ha-ha


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Related to ha-ha: sunk fence

ha-ha 1

 (hä′hä′) also haw-haw (hô′hô′)
n.
A sound made in imitation of laughter.
interj.
Used to express amusement or scorn.

ha-ha 2

 (hä′hä′) also haw-haw (hô′hô′)
[French, exclamation of surprise, ha-ha (from its being designed not to be seen until closely approached).]

ha-ha

(ˈhɑː ˈhɑː) or

haw-haw

interj
1. a representation of the sound of laughter
2. an exclamation expressing derision, mockery, surprise, etc

ha-ha

(ˈhɑː hɑː) or

haw-haw

n
(Agriculture) a wall or other boundary marker that is set in a ditch so as not to interrupt the landscape
[C18: from French haha, probably based on ha! ejaculation denoting surprise]

ha-ha1

(ˈhɑˈhɑ, ˌhɑˈhɑ)

interj.
(used as an exclamation or representation of laughter, as in expressing amusement or derision.)
[before 1000; Middle English, Old English; of imitative orig.]

ha-ha2

(ˈhɑˌhɑ)

n.
[1705–15; < French haha]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ha-ha - a loud laugh that sounds like a horse neighing
laugh, laughter - the sound of laughing
2.ha-ha - a ditch with one side being a retaining wall; used to divide lands without defacing the landscape
ditch - a long narrow excavation in the earth

ha-ha

noun
Slang. Words or actions intended to excite laughter or amusement:
Informal: funny, gag.
Translations

ha-ha

[ˈhɑːˈhɑː] EXCL¡ja, ja!

ha-ha

interjha, ha
n (= fence)versenkter Grenzzaun
References in classic literature ?
Ha-ha! (Cough-cough-cough.) And what does she put on that cap for?
Jacky Ha-Ha: My Life is a Joke is a humorous book with fun characters and great black and white illustrations.
At Sotherton, Fanny urgently cries out the possible dangers, as Henry Crawford proposes to help Maria around the edge of the gate rather than waiting for Rushworth to return with the key: "'You will hurt yourself, Miss Bertram,' she cried, 'you will certainly hurt yourself against those spikes--you will tear your gown--you will be in danger of slipping into the ha-ha. You had better not go'" (116).
It was a ha-ha, a hidden wall to protect gardens from straying cattle, and it was getting a new lease of life at Gibside Chapel, near Rowlands Gill.