ha-ha

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ha-ha 1

 (hä′hä′) also haw-haw (hô′hô′)
n.
A sound made in imitation of laughter.
interj.
Used to express amusement or scorn.

ha-ha 2

 (hä′hä′) also haw-haw (hô′hô′)
[French, exclamation of surprise, ha-ha (from its being designed not to be seen until closely approached).]

ha-ha

(ˈhɑː ˈhɑː) or

haw-haw

interj
1. a representation of the sound of laughter
2. an exclamation expressing derision, mockery, surprise, etc

ha-ha

(ˈhɑː hɑː) or

haw-haw

n
(Agriculture) a wall or other boundary marker that is set in a ditch so as not to interrupt the landscape
[C18: from French haha, probably based on ha! ejaculation denoting surprise]

ha-ha1

(ˈhɑˈhɑ, ˌhɑˈhɑ)

interj.
(used as an exclamation or representation of laughter, as in expressing amusement or derision.)
[before 1000; Middle English, Old English; of imitative orig.]

ha-ha2

(ˈhɑˌhɑ)

n.
[1705–15; < French haha]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ha-ha - a loud laugh that sounds like a horse neighing
laugh, laughter - the sound of laughing
2.ha-ha - a ditch with one side being a retaining wall; used to divide lands without defacing the landscape
ditch - a long narrow excavation in the earth

ha-ha

noun
Slang. Words or actions intended to excite laughter or amusement:
Informal: funny, gag.
Translations

ha-ha

[ˈhɑːˈhɑː] EXCL¡ja, ja!

ha-ha

interjha, ha
n (= fence)versenkter Grenzzaun
References in periodicals archive ?
McMillan points to some ha-has that appear in fiction before Jane Austen's (9-11).
The ha-ha holds rich figurative significance in Mansfield Park.
Dorothy McMillan has recently suggested that the ha-ha not only has figurative significance for Maria and her relationships but that it also tells us something about the positioning of Fanny within the Bertram household.