habitation

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hab·i·ta·tion

 (hăb′ĭ-tā′shən)
n.
1. The act of inhabiting or the state of being inhabited.
2.
a. A natural environment or locality.
b. A residence.

[Middle English habitacioun, from Latin habitātiō, habitātiōn-, from habitātus, past participle of habitāre, to dwell; see habitable.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

habitation

(ˌhæbɪˈteɪʃən)
n
1. a dwelling place
2. occupation of a dwelling place
ˌhabiˈtational adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

hab•i•ta•tion

(ˌhæb ɪˈteɪ ʃən)

n.
1. a place of residence; dwelling; abode.
2. the act of inhabiting; occupancy by inhabitants.
3. a colony or settlement; community.
[1325–75; Middle English (h)abitacioun (< Anglo-French) < Latin habitātiō a dwelling =habitā(re) to inhabit (see habitat) + -tiō -tion]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.habitation - the native habitat or home of an animal or planthabitation - the native habitat or home of an animal or plant
aerie, aery, eyrie, eyry - any habitation at a high altitude
habitat, home ground - the type of environment in which an organism or group normally lives or occurs; "a marine habitat"; "he felt safe on his home grounds"
den, lair - the habitation of wild animals
2.habitation - housing that someone is living inhabitation - housing that someone is living in; "he built a modest dwelling near the pond"; "they raise money to provide homes for the homeless"
bathroom, bath - a room (as in a residence) containing a bathtub or shower and usually a washbasin and toilet
bedchamber, bedroom, sleeping accommodation, sleeping room, chamber - a room used primarily for sleeping
cliff dwelling - a rock and adobe dwelling built on sheltered ledges in the sides of a cliff; "the Anasazi built cliff dwellings in the southwestern United States"
condo, condominium - one of the dwelling units in a condominium
den - a room that is comfortable and secluded
dinette - a small area off of a kitchen that is used for dining
dining room, dining-room - a room used for dining
dressing room - a room in which you can change clothes
family room - a recreation room in a private house
fixer-upper - a house or other dwelling in need of repair (usually offered for sale at a low price)
fireside, hearth - home symbolized as a part of the fireplace; "driven from hearth and home"; "fighting in defense of their firesides"
hermitage - the abode of a hermit
homestead - dwelling that is usually a farmhouse and adjoining land
house - a dwelling that serves as living quarters for one or more families; "he has a house on Cape Cod"; "she felt she had to get out of the house"
housing, living accommodations, lodging - structures collectively in which people are housed
kitchen - a room equipped for preparing meals
lake dwelling, pile dwelling - dwelling built on piles in or near a lake; specifically in prehistoric villages
front room, living room, living-room, sitting room, parlor, parlour - a room in a private house or establishment where people can sit and talk and relax
indian lodge, lodge - any of various Native American dwellings
messuage - (law) a dwelling house and its adjacent buildings and the adjacent land used by the household
semi-detached house - a dwelling that is attached to something on only one side
vacation home - a dwelling (a second home) where you live while you are on vacation
yurt - a circular domed dwelling that is portable and self-supporting; originally used by nomadic Mongol and Turkic people of central Asia but now used as inexpensive alternative or temporary housing
3.habitation - the act of dwelling in or living permanently in a place (said of both animals and men); "he studied the creation and inhabitation and demise of the colony"
occupancy, tenancy - an act of being a tenant or occupant
cohabitation - the act of living together and having a sexual relationship (especially without being married)
bivouacking, camping, tenting, encampment - the act of encamping and living in tents in a camp
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

habitation

noun
1. occupation, living in, residence, tenancy, occupancy, residency, inhabitance, inhabitancy 20 percent of private-rented dwellings are unfit for human habitation.
2. (Formal) dwelling, home, house, residence, quarters, lodging, pad (slang), abode, living quarters, domicile, dwelling house Behind the habitations, the sandstone cliffs rose abruptly.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

habitation

noun
A building or shelter where one lives:
abode, domicile, dwelling, home, house, lodging (often used in plural), place, residence.
Chiefly British: dig (used in plural).
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
سَكَن، سُكْنى
bydleníobydlí
beboelse
bústaîur
bývanie
oturma

habitation

[ˌhæbɪˈteɪʃən] N
1. (= act) → habitación f
to be fit/unfit for (human) habitationestar/no estar en condiciones de habitabilidad
there was no sign of (human) habitationno había señales de que estuviera habitado
2. (= dwelling) → residencia f, morada f; (= house) → domicilio m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

habitation

[ˌhæbɪˈteɪʃən] nhabitation f
unfit for human habitation → inhabitable
fit for human habitation → habitablehabit-forming [ˈhæbɪtfɔːrmɪŋ] adj
tobacco is habit-forming → le tabac crée une accoutumance
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

habitation

n(Be)wohnen nt; (= place)Wohnstätte f, → Behausung f; to show signs of habitationbewohnt aussehen; unfit for human habitationmenschenunwürdig, für Wohnzwecke nicht geeignet
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

habitation

[ˌhæbɪˈteɪʃn] nabitazione f
fit for human habitation → abitabile
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

habitable

(ˈhӕbitəbl) adjective
(negative unhabitable) (usually of buildings) fit to be lived in. The house is no longer habitable – the roof is collapsing.
ˈhabitat (-tӕt) noun
the natural home of an animal or plant. The Antarctic is the penguin's natural habitat.
ˌhabiˈtation noun
the act of living in (a building etc). These houses are not fit for human habitation.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Mrs Deborah, having disposed of the child according to the will of her master, now prepared to visit those habitations which were supposed to conceal its mother.
They evidently saw the approaching hour when the Long Knife would disposess them of their desirable habitations; and anxiously concerned for futurity, determined utterly to extirpate the whites out of Kentucke.
Occasionally spots of white were discoverable amidst the forests of the opposite hills, which announced, by the smoke that curled over the tops of the trees, the habitations of man and the commencement of agriculture.
All, as they approached, looked upward at the imposing edifice, which was henceforth to assume its rank among the habitations of mankind.
For it happened to him, as to Phoenix and Cilix, that other homeless people visited the spot, and liked it, and built themselves habitations in the neighborhood.
After eleven months wandering in the wilderness, a great part of the time over trackless wastes, where the sight of a savage wigwam was a rarity, we may imagine the delight of the poor weatherbeaten travellers, at beholding the embryo establishment, with its magazines, habitations, and picketed bulwarks, seated on a high point of land, dominating a beautiful little bay, in which was a trim-built shallop riding quietly at anchor.
Jupiter granted their request and decreed that henceforth the Ills should visit the earth in company with each other, but that the Goods should one by one enter the habitations of men.
As the Habitation of Augustus was within twelve miles of Town, it was not long e'er we arrived there, and no sooner had we entered Holboun than letting down one of the Front Glasses I enquired of every decent-looking Person that we passed "If they had seen my Edward?"
For fear the desolation And darkness of thy mind, Perplex an habitation Which thou hast left behind.
Upon this, after long debate, it was concluded that they would not remove their habitation; because that, some time or other, they thought they might hear from their governor again, meaning me; and if I should send any one to seek them, I should be sure to direct them to that side, where, if they should find the place demolished, they would conclude the savages had killed us all, and we were gone, and so our supply would go too.
My next work was to view the country, and seek a proper place for my habitation, and where to stow my goods to secure them from whatever might happen.
Then, however, there was the freshness of the passing year on its exterior, and the cheerfulness, gleaming forth from the sunny windows, of a human habitation, into which death had never entered.