haboob


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ha·boob

 (hə-bo͞ob′)
n.
A penetrating sandstorm or dust storm with violent winds, occurring chiefly in Arabia, North Africa, and India.

[Arabic habūb, strong wind, from habba, to rush, blow; see hbb in Semitic roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

haboob

(hɑːˈbuːb)
n
(Physical Geography) (in Africa and India) a storm of strong winds that whips up sand and dust from the desert
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

haboob

a heavy dust- or sandstorm of N. Africa, Arabia, and India.
See also: Wind
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Mubarak Haboob al Hajiri, team manager of the Al Zamalek team also acknowledged the move as a big boost for the youth.
Layers of dry air are good for this--this is how we get haboob storms in Phoenix.
(7.) Babiker AM, Al Gadi I, Al-Jurayyan NA, Al Nemri AM, Al Haboob AA, Al Boukai AA, Al Zahrani A, Habib HA.
Such programmes contribute to raising the competency of Saudi lawyers and preparing them to work in international legal environments," said Baker Al Haboob, SBA Secretary-General.
Baker Al Haboob, SBA secretary-general, said: "Signing the cooperation letter comes within the ongoing efforts to strengthen the SBA Academy programmes that provide the international expertise to deliver professional qualitative training.
Of a type known as a "haboob" -- an onslaught of violent, dusty winds that are usually associated with Sudan -- the storms have destroyed tin homes, uprooted trees and electricity poles, halted trains and devastated crop and livestock.
Surprisingly, the atmospheric dust that is carried by a haboob or other dust storm may have its origin hundreds or thousands of miles away.
A sandstorm that forms a distinctive wall of dust like this is called a haboob. The word is believed to have originated from Sudan and comes from the Arabic word for wind.
When the U.S.'s National Weather Service warned a small Texas town of an approaching cloud of dust Sunday, locals were apparently more upset by the name of the storm than by the storm itself -- that's because meteorologists used the Arabic load word "haboob" to describe the oncoming weather system.
Sharqi, a wind that is responsible for the phenomenon of the Haboob (sandstorm) -- which often covers Cyprus with dust from the Sahara -- is here used as a metaphor for regional cultural currents enriching Cypriot culture.