hackamore

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hack·a·more

 (hăk′ə-môr′)
n.
A halter designed for directing a horse by pressure on the nose rather than by a bit, used especially in breaking horses to a bridle.

[Alteration of Spanish jáquima, halter, from Old Spanish xaquima, from Arabic šakīma, bit of a bridle, from šakama, to bridle; see śkm in Semitic roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

hackamore

(ˈhækəˌmɔː)
n
(Horse Training, Riding & Manège) US and NZ a rope or rawhide halter used for unbroken foals
[C19: by folk etymology from Spanish jáquima headstall, from Old Spanish xaquima, from Arabic shaqīmah]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

hack•a•more

(ˈhæk əˌmɔr, -ˌmoʊr)

n.
a simple looped bridle, by means of which controlling pressure is exerted on the nose of a horse, used chiefly in breaking colts.
[1840–50, Amer.; alter. (by folk etym.) of Sp jáquima headstall < Arabic shaqīmah]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hackamore - rope or canvas headgear for a horse, with a rope for leadinghackamore - rope or canvas headgear for a horse, with a rope for leading
harness - stable gear consisting of an arrangement of leather straps fitted to a draft animal so that it can be attached to and pull a cart
headgear - stable gear consisting of any part of a harness that fits about the horse's head
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
The following day I fashioned a hackamore from a piece which I cut from the end of my long Galu rope, and then I mounted him fully prepared for a struggle of titanic proportions in which I was none too sure that he would not come off victor; but he never made the slightest effort to unseat me, and from then on his education was rapid.
The stewards informed Harris that, under rule D14, hackamores are disallowed, but the trainer made the point that nobody had noticed it while she was in the paddock, and he was unaware of the new rule.