hackie


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hack·ie

 (hăk′ē)
n.
A taxicab driver. Also called hack2, hacker2.

hackie

(ˈhækɪ)
n
another name for hack28

hack1

(hæk)

v.t.
1. to cut, notch, slice, chop, or sever with irregular, often heavy blows (often fol. by up or down): to hack down trees.
2. to clear (a road, path, etc.) by cutting away vines, trees, or other growth.
3. to damage or injure by crude, harsh, or insensitive treatment, as a piece of writing.
4. to reduce or cut ruthlessly; trim: to hack a budget severely.
5. Slang. to deal or cope with; handle; tolerate: I can't hack all this commuting.
v.i.
6. to make rough cuts or notches.
7. to cough harshly, usu. in short and repeated spasms.
n.
8. a cut, gash, or notch.
9. a tool for hacking, as an ax or pick.
10. an act or instance of hacking; a cutting blow.
11. a short, rasping dry cough.
Idioms:
hack it, Slang. to cope successfully with something.
[1150–1200; Middle English hacken; compare Old English tōhaccian to hack to pieces, c. Middle Low German, Middle Dutch, Middle High German hacken]

hack2

(hæk)

n.
1. a person, esp. a professional, who surrenders individual independence, integrity, belief, etc., in return for money or other reward: a political hack.
2. a writer whose services are for hire.
3. a person who produces banal or mediocre work or who works at a dull or routine task.
4. a horse kept for common hire or adapted for general work, esp. ordinary riding.
5. a saddle horse.
6. an old or worn-out horse; jade.
7. a coach or carriage kept for hire; hackney.
8.
a. a taxicab.
b. a cabdriver.
v.t.
9. to make a hack of; let out for hire.
10. to make trite or stale by frequent use; hackney.
v.i.
11. to drive a taxi.
12. to ride or drive on the road at an ordinary pace.
adj.
13. hired as a hack; of a hired sort: a hack writer; hack work.
14. hackneyed; trite; banal: hack writing.
[1680–90; short for hackney]
Translations

hackie

n (US inf) → Taxifahrer(in) m(f)
References in periodicals archive ?
Harold "Hackie" Reitman found himself when his toddler daughter, Rebecca, only four at the time, was diagnosed with 23 vascular tumors in her brain and a seizure disorder, and had to undergo two life-threatening surgeries.
National and international studies have shown that, although women can identify their own nutritional status properly, they have great difficulty in identifying their children's nutritional status adequately, especially in cases of overweight or obesity (Francescatto, Santos, Coutinho, & Costa, 2014; Guerrero, Slusser, Barreto, Rosales, & Kuo, 2010; Boa-Sorte et al., 2007; Hackie & Bowles, 2007).
Hackie and Bowles (2007) measured maternal perception of their obese and overweight two to five-year-old children in a Women, Infant, and Children (WIC) population in a primarily Hispanic population in Nevada.
- Hackie Chan (@hackiechan) (https://twitter.com/hackiechan/statuses/423134607186210816) January 14, 2014
Em 2007, Hackie e Bowles realizaram um estudo comparativo, a outro trabalho proposto no ano 2000, e usaram os mesmos procedimentos, mas com uma variavel demografica.