haecceity


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haecceity

(hɛkˈsiːɪtɪ; hiːk-)
n, pl -ties
(Philosophy) philosophy the property that uniquely identifies an object. Compare quiddity
[C17: from Medieval Latin haecceitas, literally: thisness, from haec, feminine of hic this]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.haecceity - the essence that makes something the kind of thing it is and makes it different from any other
essence, heart and soul, inwardness, nitty-gritty, pith, substance, gist, kernel, nub, meat, core, sum, marrow, heart, center, centre - the choicest or most essential or most vital part of some idea or experience; "the gist of the prosecutor's argument"; "the heart and soul of the Republican Party"; "the nub of the story"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Next, we should underscore that such attention to the positivity of the given opens onto a "haecceity" or a "singularity" that previous centuries had not imagined.
By contrast, Cristopner Crosbie maintains that this play does not negotiate epistemology, but rather engages Aristotelian ontology and the metaphysics of haecceity or 'thisness." He holds that while the play entertains a fundamentally nominalist picture, the community of Ephesus ultimately agrees to put faith in a stable realist metaphysics, although "the play does this by showing how an otherwise compromised nominalist epistemology, when distributed across a network of likeminded people, can facilitate the fideistic leap to this realistic metaphysic, even while masking the fideism intrinsic to such an approach"; "The Comedy of Errors, Haecceity, and the Metaphysics of Individuation," in Renaissance Papers, ed.
Or, in John Van Buren's account, it strives to speak of them as if each were a proper noun, for instance, a philosopher's patronymic: "The family name 'Heidegger,' 'Heidegger's Sache,' has only the analogical unity of identity-in-difference, because it is defined by a fundamental heterothesis and haecceity." (16) Integrally knowing such a unity is not a matter of propositional or conceptual knowledge but rather demands a "reversal in conceptually," a stripping away of concepts in order to arrive at a more essential, intuitive understanding.
It is an exercise in haecceity as the outcome is neither predictable nor replicable.
Such a bi-planar provision requires an a priori existence of the expression level, albeit not yet correlated to a meaning but necessarily present in its state of haecceity. (9) An a priori signic existence of the text qua text is always required to adequately study the problem of the knowledge of language.
Strayer explores the philosophy of abstract art from the perspectives of space, time, language, and objects and particular matters of general relevance to essentialism; haecceity, ideational objects, and identity; the space of apprehension and the field of understanding; and essentialist determination of some limits of abstraction and kinds of radical identity: selections from the haeccities series with commentary.
As it makes this move, it loses touch with an earthly quiddity (essence) and takes on a rarified haecceity ("this-ness") dependent solely on the circumstances in which not only the chair finds itself, but the capricious circumstances of the subject who encounters the chair as well.
Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari offer that the BwO plays the same role as Duns Scotus's concept of haecceity which they adopted and adapted in Anti-Oedipus (Cf, chapter I.2,) (19) and then developed in Mille Plateaus (Cf, chapter VI) in order to account for what sort of reality my mind exactly consists in, A haecceity is made up of "relations of movement and rest between molecules or particles, capacities to affect and be affected," (A Thousand Plateaus, English translation, 261,) It could be argued that here Deleuze is pursuing Henri Bergson's empiricist objective: how can I explain what is specific in a thing without imposing upon it an illusory unity?
(6) "Only this and nothing more" marks its words' being in time, scores their presence, the utterance of immediacy, phatic (but not vatic) haecceity. It is the motto, as Poe insists, of art for art's sake, art without ulterior purpose, in and as its presence in sound, its immediate, present (gift) of rhythm and, "nevermore," echo.
Along with them, anthropogenic modes of production, ideologies, systems of governance, and regulative legal structures fade into the background to highlight what Jamie Lorimer (2007) refers to as 'moments of haecceity', in which one becomes aware of and responds to the unique and often unexpected properties of others.
(a) As in Hopkins's sprung rhythm, it may be a conduit of thisness or haecceity, of instress; by stressing a syllable we ask it to stress us, to stress a responsiveness in us, to trigger a revelatory contact, an insight and a relationship (of wonder, awe, empathy, horror, etc.); what can we perceptually reach for through stress?
(52) It is no surprise, then, that in Chandler's reading of the "Ode," he misses the strange exceptionality or haecceity of the pansy, subsuming its aura in the "depth" of custom, stretching his definition of custom (now seemingly responsible for things we cannot share and repeat) in the process.