haematinic


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Related to haematinic: pernicious anaemia, transferrin

haematinic

(ˌhɛməˈtɪnɪk; ˌhiː-) or

hematinic

n
(Medicine) Also called: haematic an agent that stimulates the production of red blood cells or increases the amount of haemoglobin in the blood
adj
(Medicine) having the effect of enriching the blood
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.haematinic - a medicine that increases the hemoglobin content of the blood; used to treat iron-deficiency anemia
medicament, medication, medicinal drug, medicine - (medicine) something that treats or prevents or alleviates the symptoms of disease
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References in periodicals archive ?
Tenders are invited for Haematinic tab/cap containing (a) ferrous fumarate 200 mg to 350mg (b) vit b12 2 mcg to 10 mcg (c) folic acid 500 mcg to 1500.
Those infected with geohelminths and or malaria parasites were treated with antimalarial, anti-helminthic, and haematinic drugs free of charge at the hospital in accordance with clinical guidelines of WHO and Ministry of Health, Kenya.
Polychromatic red cells are also seen as a response to haematinic therapy in substrate (nutritional) deficiency anaemias [14].
vomitoria is reported to be useful in lowering blood pressure (Amole, 2003), and has antimalarial, antipyretic, analgesic and haematinic properties (Amole et al, 1993; Amole & Onabanjo, 1999; Amole et al, 2006; Amole & Ogunjere, 2001).
This will boost its branded generics business, as Bafna's flagship brand Raricap is the country's eighth most widely sold drug in the oral haematinic agent category (drugs which increase the amount of iron in the red blood cells), with revenues of around Rs 20 crore and with a compound annual growth rate of 64 per cent in the last three years.
Raricap, the flagship brand of Bafna, is the eighth largest in oral haematinic segment in India with eight SKUs in oral and liquid forms with an annual revenue of Rs.
Currently, retrospective analysis of existing hospital-based and research databases is virtually impossible owing to lack of haematinic investigations being undertaken and recorded in this severe DFU patient group and hospital coding systems which do not permit identification of those patients suffering from diabetic foot disease.
* A therapeutic trial of ESA should be considered in a patient with persistent symptomatic anaemia (typically haemoglobin concentration of <100 g/L) in whom haematinic deficiency has been excluded.
These are part of a leucoerythroblastic blood picture seen in bone marrow disease, malignant marrow infiltration, systemic illness and occasionally haematinic deficiency.
These include diffuse swelling of the lips and cheeks, cobblestone mucosa with fissuring and hyperplastic folds, mucosal tags, aphthous or linear non-healing ulcers, angular cheilitis, granular gingivitis and glossitis related to haematinic deficiency [Wiesenfeld et al., 1985].