haematogenous


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Related to haematogenous: hematogenous, haematogenous spread

haematogenous

(ˌhɛməˈtɒdʒɪnəs; ˌhiː-) or

hematogenous

adj
1. (Physiology) producing blood
2. (Physiology) produced by, derived from, or originating in the blood
3. (Physiology) (of bacteria, cancer cells, etc) borne by or distributed by the blood
References in periodicals archive ?
In our patient, renal cortical location, lack of evidence of urinary tract or a neighbouring infection indicated a haematogenous spread.
The different mechanisms postulated for small bowel metastasis from abdomen or pelvis include; retrograde lymphatic spread following initial blockade of para-aortic or mediastinal lymph nodes, peritoneal seedlings, direct extension by continuity or by permeation of the lymphatic spaces in connective tissues and haematogenous route.
However, it is generally believed that infection of the breast is usually secondary to a tuberculosis focus elsewhere, such as pulmonary or a lymph node in the paratracheal, internal mammary, or maxillary which may not be clinically or radiologically apparent.12 Secondary BT is caused by haematogenous spread.2 In our series two patients had evidence of
The majority develop from haematogenous spread of circulating organisms to the bone or joint, but a minority arise from direct contamination by penetrating wounds or surgery.
In this cohort and others, the most common mode of splenic involvement is haematogenous. In our cohort, we had five patients with vertebral or psoas TB, which could also be the focus of later splenic spread by contiguity.
They have a propensity for haematogenous and lymphatic spread.
We herein present a case of nosocomial meningitis complicated by multiple brain abscesses in a neurosurgical patient, which resulted from the haematogenous spread of an O117:K52:H-E.
ITB results from haematogenous spread or spread from contiguous lymph nodes or swallowed infected sputum.
Staging investigations suggested a T2N1 cancer with no haematogenous spread.
They result from direct or haematogenous spread of pathogens, or when a haematoma becomes infected.
Retinoblastoma metastasises through haematogenous dissemination, lymphatic spread, direct infiltration along the optic nerve and dispersion through the cerebrospinal fluid, after cells in the optic nerve invade the leptomeninges.