haemosiderin


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Related to haemosiderin: hemosiderosis

haemosiderin

(ˌhiːməʊˈsɪdərɪn; ˌhɛm-) or

hemosiderin

n
(Biochemistry) biochem an insoluble protein containing iron and stored in most tissues
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.haemosiderin - a granular brown substance composed of ferric oxide; left from the breakdown of hemoglobin; can be a sign of disturbed iron metabolism
ferric oxide - a red oxide of iron
pigment - dry coloring material (especially a powder to be mixed with a liquid to produce paint, etc.)
References in periodicals archive ?
Special stains, Methyl green-pyronin (MGP) for calcium deposition and pearl blue reaction for haemosiderin pigments were employed where necessary.
Over time, the haemorrhage is fully resorbed leaving behind iridescent spots of haemosiderin and macrophage deposition at the level of the internal limiting membrane.
The underlying stroma showed sheets of haemosiderin laden macrophages and clusters of mucus glands.
Brain haemosiderin in older people: pathological evidence for an ischaemic origin of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) microbleeds.
1 According to Jaffe, PVNS is characterised by thickened and hyper- plastic synovia organised into villi and nodules, which lead to the deposition of intra-cellular haemosiderin pigments.
8] A postmortem series demonstrated that the level of iron overload, reflected in the amount of haemosiderin in the tissues in males and females dying of natural causes, correlated with traditional beer consumption.
The secretory cells may contain pigment which is neither melanin nor haemosiderin.
Areas of T1 hyperintensity are present in acute haemorrhage with a characteristic haemosiderin hypo-intense rim noted in the subacute stage.
provides a linkage amid copper and iron metabolism and mediates the discharge of iron from ferritin and haemosiderin (Hays and Swenson, 1985).
Precisely the same mechanism operates at the level of the reticulum cell or macrophage, allowing re-utilisation or recycling of the iron recovered once old red cells have been removed from circulation and degraded, with temporary storage in ferritin or haemosiderin (Fig.