haftarah


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Related to haftarah: Haftorah

haf·ta·rah

or haf·to·rah (häf′tä-rä′, häf-tôr′ə)
n. pl. haf·ta·rot or haf·to·rot Judaism
A passage selected from the Prophets, read in synagogue services on the Sabbath following each lesson from the Torah.

[Mishnaic Hebrew hapṭārâ, conclusion, from hipṭîr, to conclude, dismiss, derived stem of Hebrew pāṭar, to separate, discharge; see pṭr in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Haftarah

(hɑːfˈtəʊrə; Hebrew haftaˈraː) or

Haphtarah

n, pl -taroth (-ˈtəʊrəʊt; Hebrew -taˈroːt)
(Judaism) Judaism a short reading from the Prophets which follows the reading from the Torah on Sabbaths and festivals, and relates either to the theme of the Torah reading or to the observances of the day. See also maftir
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

haf•ta•rah

or haph•ta•rah

(hɑfˈtɔr ə, -ˈtoʊr ə, ˌhɑf tɑˈrɑ)

n., pl. -ta•rahs, -ta•roth, -ta•rot (-tɑˈrɔt)
a portion of the Prophets read in the synagogue on the Sabbath and holy days immediately after the parashah.
[1890–95; < Hebrew haphṭārāh literally, finish, ending]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Haftarah - a short selection from the Prophets read on every Sabbath in a Jewish synagogue following a reading from the Torah
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References in periodicals archive ?
I joyfully teach kids and adults how to chant the words of the Siddur, as well as the proper way to recite a haftarah or read from the Torah.
With a shorter Torah service and no Haftarah (reading from the Prophets), maybe there will be less pressure.
Isaiah 58, the haftarah portion read on Yom Kippur, addresses fasting as "No, this is the fast I desire: To unlock fetters of wickedness and untie the cords of the yoke to let the oppressed go free; to break off every yoke."
Nor does our picture of nezirut grow any clearer when we turn from the section of text in which its laws are recorded to the Haftarah associated with that particular Torah portion of Naso.
"A very heavy ritualistic view of what observing a day of atonement means is in the Torah reading, and a completely social-justice-oriented version of what it means is in the haftarah readings.
* Bob memorized his haftarah for his 1957 bar mitzvah from a record but promptly erased it from his memory to make room for baseball trivia.
"We saw in this week's haftarah, King Saul defied Hashem and showed compassion for Agag the Amalekite, the ancestor of Haman, who later sought Israel's destruction.
Economist and expert in the field of Jewish ethics Meir Tamari presents Truths Desired by God: An Excursion into the Weekly Haftarah, a thoughtful study of the books of Nevi'im and their invaluable contribution to the message of Judaism.
Each week there is also a Haftarah or additional portion from other parts of the Bible.
The reading of the Torah as part of the synagogue service on Sabbaths and fast days is followed by reading a selection from one of the prophetic books, known as the Haftarah. The Book of Haftarot For Shabbat, Festivals, and Fast Days: An Easy-to-Read Haftarah Translation is the sequel to THE FIVE BOOKS OF MOSES and is a 'must' for any serious Judaic studies collection.
But, our people are less concerned with proofs regarding multiple authors of the Bible, than they are with trying to understand how the weekly parasha or haftarah can inform the decisions they are making in their own lives, or how these stories of old can help them feel a connection to things in this universe greater than their own individual lives.
He notes in the first part of his interrogatory that Jews, even synagogue-going Jews get only snippets of the prophetic writings in the haftarah selections on Shabbat and only disciplined students really get to grapple with the poetics of Isaiah and Jeremiah.