hagiolatry


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hag·i·ol·a·try

 (hăg′ē-ŏl′ə-trē, hā′jē-)
n.
Worship of the saints.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

hagiolatry

(ˌhæɡɪˈɒlətrɪ)
n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) worship or veneration of saints
ˌhagiˈolater n
ˌhagiˈolatrous adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

hagiolatry

the veneration or worship of saints. — hagiolater, n. — hagiolatrous, adj.
See also: Saints
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hagiolatry - the worship of saints
worship - the activity of worshipping
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
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E Smith, that this book is simply "hagiolatry" by an adoring granddaughter.
All an editor can do, according to Peckham, is choose one of these as the object of interest, and he castigated as "hagiolatry" our literary culture's mistaken preference for the first and last texts in the above list; this shows clearly that his thinking follows Barthes's in "The death of the author." The essentially post-structuralist ideas of Zeller and Peckham gained some purchase on editorial theory in the 1970s, but were entirely ignored in mainstream Shakespeare studies until the 1980s.
How they regarded Catholic processions, hagiolatry, indulgences, and other popish exploits remains obscure.