hagiology

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hag·i·ol·o·gy

 (hăg′ē-ŏl′ə-jē, hā′jē-)
n. pl. hag·i·ol·o·gies
1. Literature dealing with the lives of saints.
2. A collection of sacred writings.
3. An authoritative list of saints.

hag′i·o·log′ic (-ə-lŏj′ĭk), hag′i·o·log′i·cal adj.
hag′i·ol′o·gist n.

hagiology

(ˌhæɡɪˈɒlədʒɪ)
n, pl -gies
1. (Theology) literature concerned with the lives and legends of saints
2. (Theology)
a. a biography of a saint
b. a collection of such biographies
3. (Theology) an authoritative canon of saints
4. (Theology) a history of sacred writings
hagiologic, ˌhagioˈlogical adj
ˌhagiˈologist n

hag•i•ol•o•gy

(ˌhæg iˈɒl ə dʒi, ˌheɪ dʒi-)

n., pl. -gies.
1. the branch of literature dealing with the lives and legends of the saints.
2.
a. a biography or narrative of a saint or saints.
b. a collection of such works.
[1800–10]
hag`i•o•log′ic (-əˈlɒdʒ ɪk) hag`i•o•log′i•cal, adj.
hag`i•ol′o•gist, n.

hagiology

1. the branch of literature comprising the lives and legends of the saints.
2. a biography or narrative of the life of a saint or saints.
3. a collection of such biographies. — hagiologist, n. — hagiologic, hagiological, adj.
See also: Saints
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hagiology - literature narrating the lives (and legends) of the saints
literary composition, literary work - imaginative or creative writing
legend, fable - a story about mythical or supernatural beings or events
Translations

hagiology

n (form)Hagiologie f (spec)
References in periodicals archive ?
Bolotov and Turayev (3) should also be mentioned among the pioneers of Ethiopian studies because, thanks to their knowledge of Ethiopian languages (Ge'ez, Amharic), they provided the foundation for Ethiopian studies (after the October revolution) by researching Ethiopian manuscripts, church literature (Bolotov, 1887), history of the lives of Saints of the Ethiopian Church, and hagiological sources (Turayev, 1902, 1905).
In particular, after a few brief references to hagiological studies in medieval Christianity, Quintman focuses on an exposition of Patrick Geary's approach to the study of hagiographic sources (Geary 1996).